Where on Internet I Could Find a Website That Teach Painting Using Water Colour Techinque?

Why are you doing it on the internet it would be so much funner to take a class after work or on the weekend. They can also be quiet resonable and some even supply you with all the meterials. Go with some friends and make a hobby out of it. It can be good fun. .....try it!! Good luck.

1. Will water colour paint wash/rub off?

Yes water colour paint is water soluble. At best, the paint will be extremely faded and just look like a stain on your shoe.. If it even will stay on your shoes

2. water colour, are you interested in ? share your experiences or art works?

AAARGH! I hate working in watercolors! On the other hand, I have a great respect for painters who have mastered the technique. There is some amazing work being done. But, here's my problem. I have no shame in admitting that I am a lazy artist. When I am ready to create, I expect results. ... IMMEDIATE results. I am a good sketch artist. I am one of those who can put pen or pencil to paper and produce the exact image I expect to see. I can actually visualize the image on the blank medium. All I have to do is "trace" over what my mind has already put there. So, here is my problem with watercolors (and oils, and acrylics and any other wet medium. First, it takes special set up time and clean up. It's true, that it is not as much in watercolors as it does the other wet stuff, but still, there it is. When the creativity bug hits me, or when I finally visualize the graphic solution I am looking for, I want to sit down and get it done. I can do this very well, thank you, with my chosen medium, which is marking pens. Whether it is a simple Sharpie black marker, or one of the HUNDREDS of Pantone or Design color tints and tones available, all it takes is for me to pop the cap off, and, when I am done, pop it back on. What could be easier. I can take a small case of markers to the beach, the desert, the park, or my living room and draw and paint to my heart's utter content. If the muse leaves me, temorarily, then "click" the cap is back on and I can pop a beer. It's really that simple. I love the results. I can even get some nice "watercolor-like" effects, because these markers can be layered and blended with an astounding level of control. As a commercial artist, this last bit is CRITICAL. I need to get work done fast, and, very often, get it right the first time. That is also why I consider my computer an essential tool. Once an image is done, it will have to be scanned at some point, so, I do that myself, and send it to clients in that form. They LOVE it, because they would have had to pay someone to scan it, themselves. PLUS, if some part of the image needs to be reworked, I do THAT in the computer. We digital artists have a term for it. I am a Photoshop Power User. I WISH I could do real watercolor work, and sell it as original "fine art," But, I was destined to follow a different artistic path. If it's not uniquly my own path, it is still, my own.

3. What's the best paint to use? Water colour or acrylic?

Personally, I prefer the acrylics, because, if you mess up, you can always wait for it to dry, and then paint over it. Acrylics are also fun to add extra paint and make bumps, which give a painting a more life-like, or 3D look. I also think they are easier to work with. Of course, it depends on the type of painting you want to do as well. Water colors are great for landscapes and things like water. If you want to make your painting one of the best, buying cheap materials just wo not cut it. I have had experience at competitions in art, where, using better materials made my paintings get higher ribbons, and they looked nicer. For water color, buy the thick special water color paper. And buy the paints that come in the tubes. For acrylics, buy canvas boards, and the paint that comes in the tubes. Hobby Lobby is a great store to buy all of the materials I listed for decent prices. It is also better to buy in bulk. Have fun with your painting, and do not be afraid to try new things!! :)

recommended articles
Does Water Colour Paint Wash Off Clothes Easily?
Good news and bad news. Bad news first - the paint will wash out, unless you never wash it, which is unlikely. Good news - The marks from the sharpie will still lightly be visible and you can go over the sharpie with paint from Wal-mart or a craft supply store, but it has to be fabric paint. I have shirts that have been through the was 50 times with fabric paint on them and they still look great. It's cheap too.1. i want to start learning art.what the best medium water colour or arcylics?Try Artisan Paint's. They are a water based oil paint. Good luck and ENJOY2. Difference between Watercolour paints and water colour pencils?Watercolor (US) or Watercolour (UK) (and "aquarelle" in French) is a painting method. A watercolor is the medium or the resulting artwork, in which the paints are made of pigments suspended in a water soluble vehicle. The traditional and most common support for watercolor paintings is paper; other supports include papyrus, bark papers, plastics, vellum or leather, fabric, wood, and canvas. In East Asia, watercolor painting with inks is referred to as brush painting or scroll painting. In Chinese and Japanese painting it has been the dominant medium, often in monochrome black or browns. India, Ethiopia and other countries also have long traditions. Fingerpainting with watercolor paints originated in China. Paints comprise four principal ingredients: colorant, commonly pigment (an insoluble inorganic compound or metal oxide crystal, or an organic dye fused to an insoluble metal oxide crystal); binder, the substance that holds the pigment in suspension and fixes the pigment to the painting surface; additives, substances that alter the viscosity, hiding, durability or color of the pigment and vehicle mixture; and solvent, the substance used to thin or dilute the paint for application and that evaporates when the paint hardens or dries. Watercolor painting has the reputation of being quite demanding; it is more accurate to say that watercolor techniques are unique to watercolor. Unlike oil or acrylic painting, where the paints essentially stay where they are put and dry more or less in the form they are applied, water is an active and complex partner in the watercolor painting process, changing both the absorbency and shape of the paper when it is wet and the outlines and appearance of the paint as it dries. The difficulty in watercolor painting is almost entirely in learning how to anticipate and leverage the behavior of water, rather than attempting to control or dominate it. Many difficulties occur because watercolor paints do not have high hiding power, so previous efforts cannot simply be painted over; and the paper support is both absorbent and delicate, so the paints cannot simply be scraped off, like oil paint from a canvas, but must be laboriously (and often only partially) lifted by rewetting and blotting. This often induces in student painters a pronounced and inhibiting anxiety about making an irreversible mistake. Watercolor has a longstanding association with drawing or engraving, and the common procedure to curtail such mistakes is to make a precise, faint outline drawing in pencil of the subject to be painted, to use small brushes, and to paint limited areas of the painting only after all adjacent paint areas have completely dried. Another characteristic of watercolor paints is that the carbohydrate binder is only a small proportion of the raw paint volume, and much of the binder is drawn between the hydrophilic cellulose fibers of wet paper as the paint (and paper) dries. As a result, watercolor paints do not form an enclosing layer of vehicle around the pigment particles and a continuous film of dried vehicle over the painting support, but leave pigment particles scattered and stranded like tiny grains of sand on the paper. This increases the scattering of light from both the pigment and paper surfaces, causing a characteristic whitening or lightening of the paint color as it dries. The exposed pigment particles are also naked to damaging ultraviolet light, which can compromise pigment permanency. Watercolor paint is traditionally and still commonly applied with brushes, but modern painters have experimented with many other implements, particularly sprayers, scrapers, sponges or sticks, and have combined watercolors with pencil, charcoal, crayon, chalk, ink, engraving, monotype, lithography and collage, or with acrylic paint. Many watercolor painters, perhaps uniquely among all modern visual artists, still adhere to prejudices dating from the 19th century rivalry between "transparent" and bodycolor painters. Among these are injunctions never to use white paint, never to use black paint, only to use transparent color, or only to work with "primary" color mixtures. In fact, many superb paintings flout some or all of these guidelines, and they have little relevance to modern painting practice. Perhaps only with the exception of egg tempera, watercolor is the painting medium that artists most often compound themselves, by hand, using raw pigment and paint ingredients purchased from retail suppliers and prepared using only kitchen utensils. Even with commercially prepared paints, watercolor is prized for its nontoxic, tap ready solvent; lack of odor or flammability; prompt drying time; ease of cleanup and disposal; long shelf life; independence from accessory equipment (jars, rags, easels, stretchers, etc.). Its portability makes it ideal for plein air painting, and painters today can buy compact watercolor kits -- containing a dozen or more pan paints, collapsible brushes, water flask, brush rinsing cup and fold out mixing trays -- that fit neatly into a coat pocket. [edit] Washes and glazes Basic watercolor technique includes washes and glazes. In watercolors, a wash is the application of diluted paint in a manner that disguises or effaces individual brush strokes to produce a unified area of color. Typically, this might be a light blue wash for the sky. There are many techniques to produce an acceptable wash, but the student method is to tilt the paper surface (usually after fixing it to a rigid flat support) so that the top of the wash area is higher than the bottom, then to apply the paint in a series of even, horizontal brush strokes in a downward sequence, each stroke just overlapping the stroke above to pull downward the excess paint or water (the "bead"), and finally wicking up the excess paint from the last stroke using a paper towel or the tip of a moist brush. This produces an airy, translucent color effect unique to watercolors, especially when a granulating or flocculating pigment (such as viridian or ultramarine blue) is used. Washes can be "graded" or "graduated" by adding more prediluted paint or water to the mixture used in successive brush strokes, which darkens or lightens the wash from start to finish. "Variegated" washes, which blend two or more paint colors, can also be used, for example as a wash with areas of blue and perhaps some red or orange for a sky at sunrise or sunset. A glaze is the application of one paint color over a previous paint layer, with the new paint layer at a dilution sufficient to allow the first color to show through. Glazes are used to mix two or more colors, to adjust a color (darken it or change its hue or chroma), or to produce an extremely homogenous, smooth color surface or a controlled but delicate color transition (light to dark, or one hue to another). The last technique requires the first layer to be a highly diluted consistency of paint; this paint layer dissolves the surface sizing of the paper and loosens the cellulose tufts in the pulp. Subsequent layers are applied at increasingly heavier concentrations, always using a small round brush, only after the previous paint application has completely dried. Each new layer is used to refine the color transitions or to efface visible irregularities in the existing color. Painters who use this technique may apply 100 glazes or more to create a single painting. This method is currently very popular for painting high contrast, intricate subjects, in particular colorful blossoms in crystal vases brightly illuminated by direct sunlight. The glazing method also works exceptionally well in watercolor portraiture, allowing the artist to depict complex flesh tones effectively. [edit] Wet in wet Wet in wet includes any application of paint or water to an area of the painting that is already wet with either paint or water. In general, wet in wet is one of the most distinctive features of watercolor painting and the technique that produces a striking painterly effect. The essential idea is to wet the entire sheet of paper, laid flat, until the surface no longer wicks up water but lets it sit on the surface, then to plunge in with a large brush saturated with paint. This is normally done to define the large areas of the painting with irregularly defined color, which is then sharpened and refined with more controlled painting as the paper (and preceding paint) dries. Wet in wet actually comprises a variety of specific painting effects, each produced through different procedures. Among the most common and characteristic: Backruns (also called blossoms, blooms, oozles, watermarks or runbacks). Because the hydrophilic and closely spaced cellulose fibers of the paper provide traction for capillary action, water and wet paint have a strong tendency to migrate from wetter to drier surfaces of the painting. As the wetter area pushes into the dryer, it plows up pigment along its edge, leaving a lighter colored area behind it and a darker band of pigment along an irregular, serrated edge. Backruns can be subtle or pronounced, depending on the consistency of the paint in the two areas and the amount of moisture imbalance. Backruns can be induced by adding more paint or water to a paint area as it dries, or by blotting (drying) a specific area of the painting, causing the wetter surrounding areas to creep into it. Backruns are often used to symbolize a flare of light or the lighting contour on an object, or simply for decorative effect. Paint Diffusion. Because of osmotic imbalance, concentrated paint applied to a prewetted paper has a tendency to diffuse or expand into the pure water surrounding it, especially if the paint has been milled using a dispersant (surfactant). This produces a characteristic feathery, delicate border around the color area, which can be enhanced or partially shaped by tilting3. water colour, are you interested in ? share your experiences or art works?There are no mistakes in art. Once you accept that notion, watercolors do not seem so daunting. Watercolors are a meditative dance. A dance between the artist and the medium.
Can I Put Acrylic on Water Colour?
Null
At What Age Do the Skull Plates of the Head Fully Fused?
Can I Use Brand New Pressure Treated Wood to Build a Garden Box?
Null
Do These Types of Mens Shoes Exist? How Much? ?
Know About T Shirt
Cooling Tower Efficiency Boosts Bottom Line for Plastics Manufacturer
Ways to Clean Water
related searches
Does Water Colour Paint Wash Off Clothes Easily?
Can I Put Acrylic on Water Colour?
Null
At What Age Do the Skull Plates of the Head Fully Fused?
Can I Use Brand New Pressure Treated Wood to Build a Garden Box?
Null
Do These Types of Mens Shoes Exist? How Much? ?
Know About T Shirt
Cooling Tower Efficiency Boosts Bottom Line for Plastics Manufacturer

Copyright © 2020 Concises YuGa Sports | Sitemap