What Are the Holes Which Are Found in an Engine Block?

The holes in engine blocks do multiple things:1: they are threaded and have the ability to screw bolts into them. This is done to hold things on like cylinder heads, water pumps, motor mounts, etc2: they have oil flowing through them. The oil pump (most usually driven by the crankshaft) will push oil through a series of "galleys" that provide oil to other places in the engine. For example, there are often small holes in the crankshaft journals that allow oil to flow and lubricate the crank. When things that bolt to the engine require oil there are holes (for example at the cylinder head interface) that allow oil to flow into that part. you can see them on the top of the block3: they have coolant flowing through them. Except for air-cooled engines, just like oil, the engine needs coolant. there are also other parts (again, cylinder head) that require coolant as well. There are passages that allow the coolant to flow from one to the other. 4: In addition on the coolant there are what are known as "freeze plugs" in various spots. These are usually metal discs about 2 diameter (some smaller, some larger) that are made of a softer metal and pushed into the block. This is because when water freezes it expands, and if there is a freezing expansion inside a sealed block it can do a lot of damage. These freeze plugs are designed to be pushed out if the coolant freezes, and they can be easily replaced instead of replacing a cracked block from freezing.5: and of course the cylinders themselves that have the pistons.And sometimes you'll find some holes that have no purpose at all, at least in the installation that you have. For example, you could have holes in a block that are not threaded and are used for attaching some accessory that did not come on the car that you have. Or a oil galley hole that has a plug in it.What are the holes which are found in an engine block?.

1. What's the optimal placement for water pumps?

As I remember it, water pump placement does affect certain aspects including but possibly not limited to:Generally following these guidelines they are best placed somewhere near a natural water source some distance from the main body of your city. This is less of an issue than water towers because the distance the pumps effect is mitigated by piping. (Just remember to provide them with power. )As stated in my comment, take this answer with a grain of salt. I've written it entirely based off my memory and cannot prove or source any of the information

2. how many water pumps are in a volvo penta?

The water pump is located in the outdrive. You should see a screen area on the lower end where the pump is loicated. I would guess the impeller needs to be replaced. You should stop running the engine 'till it is fixed

3. how do i polish metal to a mirror shine on a buffer. or does anyone know how they polish water pumps and ect.?

Much will depend on the type of metal being polished. Your local auto parts store will have several different products for different metals, i.e., chrome, steel, stainless steel, brass, etc. Follow label directions.

4. Weiand chev short water pumps?

Asian products are copycat of Americans,but in a fauty way.. let say that pump will fit,it gonna brake in two months an spoil something else, I owns a shop( a big one) the best and most expensive in town.I have a big waiting list of customer(appointments for 3 month) why? I only use Americam made parts.on American car. if one of my suppler send me a wrong one by mistake,then they will not longer will be my supplier. if You would paid to see,Frank Sinatra ,You do not want to see Jackie Chang singing My Way in the stage.

5. Any websites where i can find parts for classic cars?

Your best bet is to try and find the individual part you need, such as "bushing 1971 Matador" or other parts. You can find water pumps, distributor caps, spark plugs, shocks, brakes and all that at your Auto Parts store. You might also think about buying a parts car. Keep everything you want and get rid of the shell later

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Baseline Testing - Do Water Pumps Suck Power? - Hot Rod Magazine
Baseline Testing - Do Water Pumps Suck Power? - Hot Rod MagazineThe Premise In our world, engine accessories are a power-robbing necessity. That's why aftermarket companies have come up with parts to minimize the losses. But is the power lost by spinning these accessories worth the money spent trying to offset the losses? We wondered how much power it took to spin a high-flow water pump versus a stocker, so we dyno-tested both setups on an engine, then compared the results with the same engine using an electric water pump. We went a step further and bolted up a set of underdrive pulleys to see if we could get back some of the power eaten up by the mechanical water pumps. Finally, we put a high-output alternator into the mix to see how much power it ate up when under a load. The Stuff Our baseline testing was done using a Meziere Series 100 electric water pump (PN WP101U, $309.95 at SummitRacing.com). This pump flows 35 gallons per minute, draws 8 amps of current, and weighs just 51?2 pounds. We also picked two mechanical water pumps from Summit. The first was an aluminum Weiand Action Plus (PN WND9240, $97.95), which weighs 6.85 pounds. Its six-blade, stamped-steel impeller not only flows better than a stocker but is said to reduce cavitation at high speeds. The Action Plus is a street/strip type of pump with a heavy-duty shaft and premium bearing, and it's leak-tested at the factory. The second pump was an iron GMB North America replacement pump (PN 130-1250, $35.95) that features a high-flow impeller, sealed bearings, and a forged housing designed to increase flow. It weighed 13.15 pounds. Finally, we added a Powermaster high-output alternator (PN 478021, $188.95) to the accessory drive to see how much power it consumed. This one-wire alternator puts out 80 amps at idle speed and 140 amps max, more than enough to power electric fuel pumps, a huge audio system, or whatever else you want to attach to the battery. 78) was used here. We made three pulls with each combination of parts, made sure the water and oil temps were identical at the start of each pull, then averaged the results using SuperFlow's Windyn software. The Results Using the Meziere electric pump and no other accessories, the small-block put out 531.2 hp at 6,600 rpm and 475.9 lb-ft of torque at 5,300 rpm (as an average of the three pulls). We bolted on the Weiand Action Plus water pump and Trans-Dapt 1.0:1 billet aluminum pulleys and found 527.5 hp and 474.5 lb-ft of torque at the same rpm points, resulting in a loss of 3.7 hp and 1.4 lb-ft. Next, we simulated the restriction that a pressurized, closed cooling system would place on the water pump by installing a restrictor plate with a 5/8-inch hole in the water neck. We found no difference in power. We used the Weiand water pump when we tested the Powermaster alternator, wiring it directly to the battery powering the dyno. The battery had a full charge but still needed to power the MSD Digital 7 spark box and Aeromotive A1000 electric fuel pump. The alternator ate up 8.1 hp and almost 4 lb-ft of torque. Conclusions The lightest and most powerful combination of parts was the simplest--the Meziere electric water pump. It was also the most expensive at $309.95. The Weiand/March pulley combo yielded almost the same amount of power output as the electric pump--equipped engine did for $291.83. The Weiand mechanical pump also required less power to turn than the GMB pump, but the GMB pump was $62 cheaper. The question remains as to how well any these cooling combos will cool on the street. An engine dyno wo not tell you that no matter how nicely you ask it. The alternator did sap a substantial amount of power, but if you have a lot of electronics in your hot rod it's certainly an acceptable loss. If you are really concerned about the power loss, you can rig a setup to bypass the alternator at WOT. Bottom Line For some, the simplicity of the electric water pump (no belts or pulleys to fail) is often overshadowed by their worry about it failing, though many of the cars at Drag Week and elsewhere have proved they are pretty reliable. For max power and minimum weight, it's the way to go. Electric water pumps also allow you to cool the engine without having to run it. If the sight of belts spinning pulleys makes you happy, and you do not mind losing a few ponies to parasitic losses, then go with mechanical cooling. The underdrive pulleys will make up most of the lost power, anyway. Finally, we learned that Powermaster makes a really powerful alternator that requires almost double-digit power numbers to spin when it's under load.
Video: How to Prep & Clean Mating Surfaces for Leak-Free Gasket Installation
The best gasket in the world wo not seal worth a hoot if your mating surfaces are not properly cleaned and prepared beforehand. But, while a lot of how-tos out there include "surface prep" as a critical step, they rarely go into much detail on the actual cleaning and surface-prep process. That's why we liked this video from the gasket gurus at Fel-Pro. It goes in-depth on to how to make sure your cylinder head and engine block surfaces are clean and ready for a gasket install. More importantly, it address how to create a good seal when working with many types of gasketing material, e.g. cork, rubber, multi-layer steel, copper, etc. At the end of the video, you will even see a few tools that you should NEVER use to clean a surface for a gasket install. Though the video features cylinder heads and headers, the key to surface prep has a lot to do with the the surface material, for instance, iron, steel, or aluminum-so you can take these principles and apply them to whatever component you are prepping, including water pumps, oil pans, differential covers, intake manifolds, etc. The video focuses on what is perhaps the most important facet of a good, leak-free gasket install: surface prep. Note: Once your surface is clean, you will want to check it for flatness, too-watch this video from Fel-Pro to learn how to do that. If you've got a project coming up which involves removing/replacing gaskets, give it a watch and ensure your job goes smoothly.1. What is the voltage that is used at water parks to operate water pumps?If pumps are huge,higher voltages of 6.6 kv is used.Normally440voltis sufficient in 3 phase2. car over heat, have tried EVERYTHING?Water pumps leak whilst they placed on out. Water could be lost by using a undesirable head gasket or a cracked head, a undesirable hose, heaer center. i might examine the water pump first. sense around under its shaft housing, at the back of its pulley in case you may get to it. moist palms= leak. Crusty, flakey deposits= leak. additionally, verify the radiator followers run3. What would happen if you combined two water pumps?Any discharge piping system down stream of a pump (in this case a hose) will have a pressure drop that varies with flow. You can develop a curve of this pressure where flow rate is plotted against pressure drop. Any centrifugal pump will have a performance curve. The lower the discharge head (pressure) the more the pump will pump. The higher the head the less the pump will pump. Assuming these are centrifugal pumps then their performance will balance with the system pressure drop curve to seek a point on each pump's operating curve that matches the overall system pressure drop curve. In other words the pressure will go up some and the flow rate will also go up some but neither will double.4. Do I need a new water pumping my 1996 Acura TL?not knowing where the leak is coming from. if it's not actually leaking, just overflowing, likely it's just a thermostat issue. if the pump is leaking, needs changing. sometimes the t-stat goes first. one causes the other to fail. FYI, water pumps and thermostats lasting or failing is directly related to coolant condition and after care. they are also considered a consumable item/component. in all instances, all manufacturers/models, there are water pumps and t-stats that have been changed, and there are those that will be changed. simply the nature of the game.5. How much are new water pumps for a yamaha 450?you can get a boysen water pump for for under 100$6. Anti-freeze leaking out of my car, why?I would first check the easy things first before you spent any money. Make sure all the hoses leading to the radiator are tightly connected. If that doesnt fix it i would look for leaks in the water pump gaskets, maybe a head gasket, or a leaking radiator. If the car blows white smoke out the exhaust it is usually a head gasket but if its not blowing white smoke and overheating you should be alright. A radiator can be anywere from 75 to 150$ at a junkyard if you want to replace it yourself. Hoses can be around 10-20 $. Water pumps can be around 100. Leaking thermostates can be about 10. Hope that helps
What Are the Holes Which Are Found in an Engine Block?
The holes in engine blocks do multiple things:1: they are threaded and have the ability to screw bolts into them. This is done to hold things on like cylinder heads, water pumps, motor mounts, etc2: they have oil flowing through them. The oil pump (most usually driven by the crankshaft) will push oil through a series of "galleys" that provide oil to other places in the engine. For example, there are often small holes in the crankshaft journals that allow oil to flow and lubricate the crank. When things that bolt to the engine require oil there are holes (for example at the cylinder head interface) that allow oil to flow into that part. you can see them on the top of the block3: they have coolant flowing through them. Except for air-cooled engines, just like oil, the engine needs coolant. there are also other parts (again, cylinder head) that require coolant as well. There are passages that allow the coolant to flow from one to the other. 4: In addition on the coolant there are what are known as "freeze plugs" in various spots. These are usually metal discs about 2 diameter (some smaller, some larger) that are made of a softer metal and pushed into the block. This is because when water freezes it expands, and if there is a freezing expansion inside a sealed block it can do a lot of damage. These freeze plugs are designed to be pushed out if the coolant freezes, and they can be easily replaced instead of replacing a cracked block from freezing.5: and of course the cylinders themselves that have the pistons.And sometimes you'll find some holes that have no purpose at all, at least in the installation that you have. For example, you could have holes in a block that are not threaded and are used for attaching some accessory that did not come on the car that you have. Or a oil galley hole that has a plug in it.What are the holes which are found in an engine block?.1. What's the optimal placement for water pumps?As I remember it, water pump placement does affect certain aspects including but possibly not limited to:Generally following these guidelines they are best placed somewhere near a natural water source some distance from the main body of your city. This is less of an issue than water towers because the distance the pumps effect is mitigated by piping. (Just remember to provide them with power. )As stated in my comment, take this answer with a grain of salt. I've written it entirely based off my memory and cannot prove or source any of the information2. how many water pumps are in a volvo penta?The water pump is located in the outdrive. You should see a screen area on the lower end where the pump is loicated. I would guess the impeller needs to be replaced. You should stop running the engine 'till it is fixed3. how do i polish metal to a mirror shine on a buffer. or does anyone know how they polish water pumps and ect.?Much will depend on the type of metal being polished. Your local auto parts store will have several different products for different metals, i.e., chrome, steel, stainless steel, brass, etc. Follow label directions.4. Weiand chev short water pumps?Asian products are copycat of Americans,but in a fauty way.. let say that pump will fit,it gonna brake in two months an spoil something else, I owns a shop( a big one) the best and most expensive in town.I have a big waiting list of customer(appointments for 3 month) why? I only use Americam made parts.on American car. if one of my suppler send me a wrong one by mistake,then they will not longer will be my supplier. if You would paid to see,Frank Sinatra ,You do not want to see Jackie Chang singing My Way in the stage.5. Any websites where i can find parts for classic cars?Your best bet is to try and find the individual part you need, such as "bushing 1971 Matador" or other parts. You can find water pumps, distributor caps, spark plugs, shocks, brakes and all that at your Auto Parts store. You might also think about buying a parts car. Keep everything you want and get rid of the shell later
I've Replaced: Thermostat, Rad Cap, Coolant (all Coolant). Warms Up Normal, but Runs Hot (just Under
Water pumps rarely go out. Have the radiator cleaned out by a radiator shop1. who can recommend me some good water pumpS?Water pump. ( Pond ) Sump pump. ( Flood prevention ) Auto water pump. ( Radiator ) What is the specific purpose of the pump.2. Are submersible water pumps silent?they all make noise. my Ex had them all, arrrgh!3. is It true that seals on water pumps usually start leaking after around 5 years? why how depends?My OEM Toyota water pump lasted 26 years before it started leaking. The main reason a water pump gets replaced is either when it fails or on a high mileage engine that is getting the timing belt replaced. It makes economic sense to do it then because 90 percent of the labor is shared between both jobs. The coolant should be replaced about every 30,000 miles or three years whichever occurs first. Five years is too long in my opinion and experience.4. Do submersible water pumps need to be submersed in water to function properly?That's not the problem here. You would need to put the filter ahead of the pump, as is done in any aquarium setup, or the pump itself will clog. That said, you absolutely should be changing the cat's water at least once a day, so worrying about minor dust or gunk is irrelevant5. Do submersible water pumps need to be submersed in water to function properly?Basically the two types of pump that are appropriate for this application are the centrifugal pump and the displacement pump. Both types can be submerged.The displacement pump uses small chambers built into a rotating disk. When operating, the action creates suction on one side, often allowing several feet of water to be LIFTED and ejected. Displacement pumps such as the FloJet series do not need to be submerged and can be located some distance from the liquid.The centrifugal pump requires fluid to fill the vane chamber, without air. These work by spinning an impeller at high speed, creating a pressure difference between the fluid at the centre of the vane and the outer edge. The low pressure at the inlet draws fluid into the chamber, but any air present will disturb the vacuum. Centrifugal pumps generally have a higher flow rate and operate at much lower pressures than displacement pumps.So for the water dish, if you can guarantee that there will always be water for the pump to work with, the centrifugal pump would be least expensive, quieter and reasonably reliable. If the dish runs dry, the pump could become damaged, so a method of detecting the water level would be required6. How can I build on top of lakes?With the release of version 0.13, researching the landfill technology will let you construct a landfill item that replaces water with grass. It costs 20 stone to create and builds in half a second.Unfortunately there is no equivalent item to turn land into water, so be careful not to deprive yourself of locations for water pumps!.7. Correct calculations for 20kW solar system?Projecting 7 hours/day seems a bit high. I have friends that have off-grid systems and you want to be VERY conservative with your design criteria assumptions. What do you do on cloudy days? What do you do when someone uses more than average usage? My friends home systems are much smaller (24 golf-cart size batteries and 12-16 panels) and they cost $35,000 - $45,000. Their system will not even cover things like air conditioning, water pumps, etc. BTW, this is a HUGE system. Probably over 150 panels and an enormous bank of batteries. I would estimate this system will cost over $150,000. The average power cost in the U. S. is 10 cents/KWH. This facility will then have an annual grid cost of about $5000. It seems very expensive for a system that will not give you reliable 24/7 power.8. Car heating up when parked ?It could be a stuck thermostat, electic cooling fan not spinning fast enough or at all, and insufficent coolant amount or quality. When you drive, air flows across the radiator actively providing sufficent cooling. A stuck thermostat will prevent the proper amount of coolant to circulate within the engine based upon coolant temperature. The thermostat may be partially stuck or fully stuck. A fully stuck Thermostat can lead to a blown head gasket if it is let go long enough. The electric cooling fan speed is controlled by a thermal switch often placed within or on the huosing of your transmission. When you get on the freeway the switch is opened to allow the fan to spin freely. Off the freeway or stationary the fan is supposed to start or speed up. The switch may be sticky or failed. Check to see if you fan is running when you are stationary and you notice the tempature to be climbing. You may have a coolant leak. Check your hoses to and from the radiator, the engine and the heater core assembly. Check the ground where you park your car for coolant. Coolant on the ground can be a symptom of a water pump getting ready to fail. Water pumps have a small hole on their underside called a Weep Hole. Coolant dripping from this location when the car is off is an indication of a water pump getting ready to shat the bed. Insucfficent coolant amount will prevent your engine from cooling itself enough. You can tell if you need coolant by looking at the Overfill or Recovery bottle mounted to interior fender well. There are marks on the side of the translucent bottle to indicate the amount of collant you need at the appropiate tempatures. Coolant that is too old wo not cool your engine enough. If it has been more than two years since you have had your coolant changed, it has been two long. Make sure the shop that changes your coolant uses the proper fluid specified in your owners manual. If you do not have an owners manual you can download a copy for FREE from the manfacturers website.
How Do You Get Water Pumps Working in Sim City Creator for the Wii?
the water pump has to be next to a pond of fresh water not sea water1. Will the water pumps on a late '49-'53 Mercury Flat Head Engine tolerate the tight Tension?=if you are mounting the alt. up top where the generator is=it wont harm the water pumps=and a 1/2 inch belt deflection is about right anyway=i have seen many conversions to 12 volt with no problems developing down the road=do save the generator because the originals are getting harder to find all the time=2. squeaking noise in '88 firebird pully system!!!?it's probably the belt tensioner and/or Idler pully. water pumps do not really squeak because they are constantly being lubricated via the antifreeze. alternator's do not really squeak unless the bearings are giving out. the belt tensioner and idler pullys can squeak for a while & stop when they get warmer because the grease inside has disapated and/or leaking out. could also be the tensioner unit itself. These are EASY things to replace anyway. the idler is located on the right side of the motor if you are facing it. the tensioner is under the air intake hose.3. Why do I always see water being pumped out of a ship's hull? What did they do before water pumps?if you are speaking about actual ships as in commercial or military, that water usually is from cooling or de-ballasting. water is sucked up thru sea strainers and goes thru AC systems, heaters, coolers, heat exchangers and so forth and then exited overboard. Large fuel tanks also use sea water to fill in the storage tanks, then is purified prior to transfer to service tanks for use. keeps air out. some are water being pumped out fom bilges or grey water from galley. hope this is your answer. long time ago, guess it be lots of buckets4. how do the plumbing on a hot tub with two water pumps?The smaller pump will be used for circulation and heating. The larger pump will be used for the jets if possible please send me a picture of what you have and i will draw up a diagram for you.5. how many water pumps are needed in a country like... africa or pakistan?LIKE A BAJILLION!!! You can never have too many water pumps. You buy them from the water pump store on the corner of 85th and Broadway, next to the Wachovia Bank branch across the street. P.S.: Africa is NOT a country. LMAO!!!6. I have changed water pumps before, but this chrysler sebring is horrible. Any helpful hints would be great.?I assume you have the 3.3 V6 All has to be removed. It is a pain but thats how they build them. Get a chiltons book if your not familiar, it's a 25.00 lifesaver. Hayne's not as good - but cheaper to buy.7. What is better to have-Well water or city/county water? Why?Some factors to consider when looking to purchase a home with Well Water: The quality of the water -- does it taste bad, or smell bad? If you are touring the home.... just take a moment to turn on the hot water at the sink, and let it run for awhile.... this will tell you very quickly if there is a high content of sulfur in the water. It has a very distinct odor, and can be a pain to get rid of. You might want to take a package of dixie cups with you, in your car, when looking at homes, to taste the water. Remember, if you buy the home, you will have to either live with the water, or find a solution. You may want to consider asking the homeowner to have the well water tested by the local health agency. They can pick up a test kit for free, and I believe, in most places, the first test is free...after that, it runs about $10 per test. They will need to carefully follow the instructions in the test kit, to avoid contaminating the sample. Large home supply stores also carry these test kits, if you would like to check on this yourself. (Something you should do as part of your normal home maintenance over the years, to help ensure that your water stays pure) Look for 'scaly deposits'. "Hard" water, whether city or well, will leave a scaly buildup.... if the home has a water softener system (the most common solution to hard water), then you know it has hard water, and you will need to consider the ongoing expense of maintaining the softener system.... purchasing salt, for example. How deep is the well? How is it cased? Where is the water level at in the well? Where is the pump located? I placed all three of these questions together, because they are related. I live in an area, where 25 to 50 years ago, it was common to put in 'shallow wells'... that is about 60 ft deep. This is because the water table is actually fairly high here. You should ask the neighbors at what level their own wells are at, and if they have any issues with the water.... silt, hardness, taste, smell, etc. When I had a new well drilled, we went 250 feet. (to avoid a pocket of lime, which was building up in the original well) After drilling, the water level was less than a foot from the top of the steel casing. We cased to around 220 ft, and put the pump, in the well, at about 160 feet. We do not have to be concerned about the well 'caving in' on the pump because we cased (with steel) so far past where we were placing the pump. And with the water level so near the top of the well head (where the casing comes up out of the ground) we have a large volume of water to draw on, whenever we want it. Shallow wells will often be very small diameters, sometimes as small as 2" pipe. It is often very easy to run out of water. Jet pumps are another type of well pump. These are most often located near the well head, on top of the ground, rather than in the well itself. There are pro's and con's of using jet pumps, and 'in the well' pumps. Obviously, it is easier to work on a jet pump... its right where you can get at it.... a pump in the well, has to be pulled out, to work on it. On the other hand... if for any reason the jet pump has been shut off, you may have to 'prime' the pump, before it will work, that is, you have to actually pour water into it, to get it to work. "Priming" isnt necessary with submerged pumps. These are things you need to consider if the pumps are several years old. Water pressure - this can be affected by the bladder tank. If the well has low water pressure, putting a little air in the tank will usually take care of this problem. The bladder tank is usually located at the well head, its often a light blue in color. If you look at the top (the usual location) you should see an air valve... just like you see on tires.....and stamped nearby, should be the PSI (Pounds per Square Inch) that the bladder should be set at, just like you would have on your tires. You can use a hand pump, or air compressor to add air, and a standard tire gauge to check the actual air pressure level of the bladder tank. Increasing the psi in the bladder, will increase the water pressure, so it is very easy, to get the water pressure you want out of your system. With a city or county provided system, you get what pressure you have from their system.... you have no way to increase it, but you can, if need be, reduce it (this isnt a normal occurrence however). City and County water, of course have things like chlorine, flouride, and other things added to it, to keep it clean, and in the case of flouride, to help with your dental health. I would pass on the advice of our dentist.... if you use a well, then make using a flouride rinse a daily part of your dental care. The 'taste' of water does vary. It will be affected by what is in it. (Dasani bottled water for example, adds minerals to give it a unique taste) Often times, well water DOES taste better than the nearby city or county water. You, as the homeowner, are responsible for the upkeep and quality of your water, if you have a well. I have installed things like water pumps and purifiers, in homes on city water supply systems... so that is no gaurantee that city water is better. Taste is taste... and varies from person to person. What some folks can taste in water, others cannot even tell it is there. So, the big questions, when looking at well water... how deep is the well, how is it cased, where is the pump, how old are the components (the pump, bladder, switch, etc.), and what quality is the water (smell, taste, hard/soft, etc.). Personally, I like to know what kind of pipes are in a home I am considering for purchase too. Because this will affect maintenance costs, over the years (and sometimes, flavor). Does a home have galvanized steel, copper, cpvc, or pex? Galvanized steel does eventually rust. Copper pipes, if used as the electrical system's "ground" can suffer from a "leech effect", where copper atoms are actually pulled out of the copper pipes.... I once saw a home where the copper pipes had actually become thinner than paper, hehehe... causing many leaks. cpvc is easy to install and maintain. The only real concern with cpvc, is that it breaks when frozen. I keep a repair kit handy myself.... water never freezes during a plumber's working hours, lol. pex tubing is very popular with a lot of mobile home manufacturers.... the down side... its expensive for the homeowner to work on. A typical valve made for pex, will run 2 to 3 times, the cost of a brass, or cpvc valve. Pex tubing, in most cases, is installed using a copper clip.... the tool to install that crimp band, costs about $100. Just something to think about, hehehe. Oh, by the way.... the USDA Rural Development now keeps track of well locations, and quality. You may consider checking with them, if you have concerns about a particular property, or the current owners are unable to answer your questions. Happy Shopping!
Honda Skipping Really Bad!!!?
Honda make everything from cars & bikes to lawnmowers & water pumps. To which do you refer?1. i have a silverado and the radiator fluid is going some where and there are no leaks and the oil is clean?FILL COOLANT,RUN UNTIL TRUCK WARMS UP. LET IT SIT OVERNIGHT. SEE IF THERE IS COOLANT BELOW THE FAN BLADE....WATER PUMPS ARE COMMON. INTAKE COUL BE LEAKING IN BACK RUNNING OVER BELLHOUSING,BUT THAT WILL BE A SLOW LEAK2. VW new beetle 1.8Turbo high coolant temperature lamp flashing !!!?Water pumps give trouble as well. The impeller can come loose and spin on the shaft3. Do I need to use an air pump for a 40 gallon fish tank?Not necessarily, but you do need water circulation of some kind. Devices such as power filters, canister filters, powerheads, and water pumps circulate the water, and therefore oxygenate the water. Oxygenation takes place mainly at the surface of the tank, not in the air bubbles rising from an air stone. Air pumps oxygenate water because they circulate the water, but they are not the only means of circulating water. Just make sure that your water circulation does disturb the surface of the water, so that all the water in the tank is brought to the surface periodically4. is It true that seals on water pumps usually start leaking after around 5 years? why how depends?Water pump seals tend to go bad when people do not replace their antifreeze every 3 years or when there is a coolant leak and people only add water to the cooling system. Antifreeze has a lubricant in it for the water pump seal and diluting the coolant means there is less lubricant to keep the seal from frying. I would not worry about your every 5 year concern. Timing belts get replaced at 100,000 miles on most motors. Do the water pump with the timing belt and make sure the timing belt pulleys and hydraulic tensioner are replaced too.5. (RasPi) Trying to control 2 different water pumps with different relaysThe things you need to keep in mind are 1) Check the max voltage and current rating of each motor 2) make sure your supply is capable enough for producing enough amount of current when both the motors are working simultaneously and under full load as well as to be compatible with relay 3) make sure the relays ratings of current and voltage lie within the range of power supply cause so as to avoid damaging.For starters the standard batteries wo not cut it. Meaning you need a power supply of high enough rating to drive the entire circuit apart from raspberry pi. If you meet all these conditions then the circuit will work successfully6. Any DC-powered, low flow-rate, inexpensive water pumps?I believe those are popularly called fountain pumps. However, I believe most fountains use a submersible pump. The wikipedia talks about big applications, but of course the size of the application depends on the size of the pump and vice versa. I could not found reference, but this shop says:(This is of course only guaranteed to go for their own products.)Also, on that page are some smaller pumps, so there are smaller applications than the on the wiki mentioned oil well!Most of these pumps are AC powered. There sure are DC powered submersible pumps, however, I could not find them as small and cheap as the AC powered mentioned in the first shop.7. Do pond water pumps make noise?majority of the pond pumps you get to day are extreamly quiet and wont bother the fish or you at all8. what are the different types of water pumps for pontiac motors up to 1981?did you happen to loose the aluminum spacer between the water pump output shaft, and the fan pulley?9. Why do I always see water being pumped out of a ship's hull? What did they do before water pumps?Hard to say, water is discharged from the engine cooling system, the air cooling systems, and other systems, like the ballast system. In old wooden boats, they kept water in the hull to keep the wood swollen so the ship would not leak.10. 80k Maintenance on Toyota Prius?You do not say what year, but assuming a 2004-2009: Prius technical group members recommend changing the transaxle fluid at 30-40,000 mile intervals based on lab analysis of some of the group members' Prius, including mine (Yes, it's more frequent than the book says). This is a drain and fill--never a flush. There is no torque converter in the Prius to flush and it's possible a flush will force the transaxle fluid past the seals where it should not go. The inverter and engine coolant change is not due till 100,000 miles. Neither are spark plugs. When you change the coolant you might want to consider changing the water pumps and belt too. There is no particular problem with the water pumps but water pumps do not last forever and it's probably cheaper to do when they are already working with the cooling system. Note that the engine and inverter have separate cooling circuits--so you could do them at two different times to spread the cost. The belt only runs the engine water pump. The inverter water pump is electric. Flushing the radiator with vacuum type systems is not recommended. Using the Toyota coolant is recommended because it has the correct anti-corrosion chemicals. If you have the extended warranty you might want to do the cooling and spark plugs slightly before the 100,000 mile mark in case the dealer messes up so you wo not have to fight them to fix it correctly (for free). The 80K mile checkup as shown in the Passport to Performance pamphlet is mostly an oil and filter change, rotating the tires, and some inspections.
Vw Car Over Heating ..and Liquid Was Coming at the Bottom..?
Hopefully you pulled over and turned off the car. It's ok to run a car without any coolant however you can only do it for short jumps and then wait for it to cool down again. It could be alot of things making it leak, something simple like a hose, could be a bad leak in your radiator, or it could be that your water pump went out. You can check by filling your car radiator up with water again (Coolant is just antifreeze mixed with water). Make SURE You do not have your Air Conditioner running - just have the temp set to OFF, very important because you would quickly freeze the water! Then just see what is leaking in the engine. Water pumps are fairly easy to replace usually, however if you have no experience at all in cars then you would be stuck with a mechanic (Good luck with those people, they like to screw people over alot). If you have any friends that are mechanically inclined you might want to ask them for help, like I said it's not a hard job. If it's a hose it's really easy, there's just a couple clamps holding them on which normally come off with a screw driver. Those only cost about 15 dollars, including the clamps, assuming you do it yourself. Most likely is not the radiator unless you smacked into a large bird or damaged it, they normally wear out slowly and over a long time, not quickly and unexpectedly like a water pump or hose. If it's a slow leak, just a drop here and there, and you can not really find where it's coming from, then you should be able to use some additive like stop-leak. If it's a steady water stream it's probably the water pump - those cost around 50 dollars or so, plus installing from a mechanic usually would be around 100 I would imagine.1. Shoundn't priority one (japan relief) be to power the nuke plants' water pumps so this business will end?the problem is that the tsunami pretty much devasted the entire region. aside from that, it's a swell idea.2. Do standard water pumps used to pump water to a home distancing of 35 ft...?There should be a pressure switch that will turn the pump on when the pressure drops and turn the pump off when the maximum pressure is reached. These work automatically and cut on/off pressures can be adjusted. There should also be a pressure tank and a pressure relief valve to insure the tank does not burst. Both can be purchased and installed or replaced.3. Pattern Problems: 6.7L Power Stroke vs. LML DuramaxPattern problems. Every engine ever assembled has them. Some experience fewer trivial failures than others, but in the end all internal combustion power plants have their quirks. When it comes to diesel pickups, down time often means lost income, so it definitely pays to know what you are getting into when you invest upward of $40,000 in a late-model (new or used) -ton or larger diesel truck. In the case of the 6.7L Power Stroke and the LML Duramax-both having been out since 2011-most of these engines' mild to moderate flaws have been exposed and well-documented by now. On a recent visit to Flynn's Shop in Alexander, Illinois, a shop that specializes in each of the Big Three, we were clued in as to which repeat issues occur most with each brand's highly-esteemed V8. Though Ford seems to have ironed out the majority of the issues associated with the Navistar-derived Power Strokes of yesteryear thanks to building its own Power Stroke in-house, many 6.7L-powered Super Dutys drive into Flynn's service bays with coolant and oil leaks. As for the LML Duramax, emissions system-related failures run rampant and the age-old clogged cooling stack scenario continues to play out regularly on trucks that work out in the field. For an in-depth look at the top four pattern problems for each engine, keep scrolling. Arguably the most common issue on the 6.7L Power Stroke is associated with the vacuum pump. Over time, the pump's mounting bolts loosen and can even back out completely. When they loosen their grip, oil is allowed to escape past the gasket sandwiched between the vacuum pump and the block, with an oil drip or small puddle inevitably developing under the oil pan. For best results, it's ideal to pull the vacuum pump completely, replace the gasket and hit the mounting bolts with Loctite before reinstalling them. However, in a pinch you can tighten three of the four bolts by removing the factory air intake (to gain access) and using an 8mm open-end wrench. A close second to the vacuum pump gasket issue is the tendency for the turbo coolant feed line to leak on '11-'14 engines. Due to vibration, the seal inside the quick-connect type fitting at the turbo fails, causing a small yet noticeable coolant leak. Replacing the coolant supply line is fairly straightforward, but you have to remove the upper intake plenum to gain proper access to it. Both the OEM hard line and fitting can be purchased for less than $40. Premature water pump failure is fairly common. Just to clarify, the 6.7L Power Stroke makes use of two separate cooling systems (a high-temp primary and a low-temp secondary system), so in this instance we are referring to the engine's primary water pump. For whatever reason (casting sand, supplemental coolant additives, etc.), a lot of water pumps do not make it 100,000 miles before failing-and a fair share of pumps even kick the bucket before hitting 40,000 miles. So far it seems to be the luck of the draw on getting an engine with a good primary water pump, as some die early while others last well beyond 150,000 miles. To keep your water pump, water neck, radiator hoses and even radiator in optimum health, a coolant filtration system (such as the one offered by DieselSite) is never a bad idea. This one has been a problem for Ford since the 6.4L Power Stroke debuted in '08 and it's still a semi-frequent failure today. Once again, we are referring to the 6.7L Power Stroke's primary cooling system when we talk about radiator failure. Similar to the problem found in the 6.4L application, the leaks originate where the plastic end tanks crimp onto the metal core. While leaking radiators were most common on early '11 model 6.7L Power Strokes, the folks at Flynn's still see plenty of '12-'16 Super Dutys experiencing this issue. The verdict is still out on the '17-'19 trucks, as they are still pretty new. As the 6.6L LML Duramax begins to age, more '11-'16 Chevy and GMC HD trucks are being diagnosed with cracked exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) coolers. But this emissions-related, coolant-burning failure is not reserved solely for high-mileage candidates. Some EGR coolers rupture even before the 50,000-mile mark. Telltale signs of a cracked EGR cooler include disappearing coolant (that's not making it into the crankcase) and white smoke out the tailpipe. We will note that some shops misdiagnose failed EGR coolers for blown head gaskets-the difference between the labor and parts involved in both jobs being tremendously different. Always make sure the EGR cooler is pressure tested for leaks before committing to a head gasket job on your Duramax. Problems with the emissions control systems on modern diesel trucks are highly common. With so many new technologies and components being employed to curb NOx, particulate matter emissions and CO2 emissions, it's no wonder so many trucks barely make it out of warranty before experiencing a failure. Fortunately for LML owners, GM is well aware of its chronic diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) reservoir heater failures. If your truck's VIN falls into the covered range, a 10-year/120,000-mile warranty applies to your DEF heater. When this baby goes out it's usually associated with a CEL and a P20B9 code being stored, along with a "Service Exhaust Fluid System" message on the dash. But do not put off dealing with the problem. If you continue to drive with a bad DEF heater, eventually the ECM will place itself in power reduction mode or limit the truck's top speed until it's fixed. We will note that this failure is much more common in colder climates (i.e. the upper Midwest and Canada). If you start noticing higher coolant temperatures than you are used to seeing, a common problem among all Duramax-powered GM HDs may be at work: a plugged cooling stack (all the heat exchangers mounted in front of the engine). Especially on trucks that are worked hard and rarely cleaned, see frequent field use or are full-on service trucks, the cooling stack can become chock full of debris over time, which blocks airflow across the radiator. For optimum results, it's best to take the time to disassemble and remove the cooling stack, cleaning each heat exchanger individually. However, in a time crunch a power washer can work wonders for opening up airflow through the cooling stack. The broken crankshaft phenomenon extends across all model years of the 6.6L Duramax. The fact that it occurs just as much in bone-stock to moderately modified engines as it does in excessive rpm, high horsepower mills leaves a lot of enthusiasts scratching their heads. While a broken crankshaft is nowhere near as common as an EGR cooler or DEF heater failure, the folks at Flynn's still see them more often than they would like to. To date, poor external balancing from the factory, a lack of meat in key areas and the engine's firing order have all been blamed for the crankshaft's relatively high (as compared to Cummins and Power Stroke mills) failure rate, with no definite causes(s) yet known. Turbo failure is also a fairly common occurrence on the '11-'14 6.7L Power Stroke. You can read up on the problem (along with the long-term solution) here.
Can U Replace Just the Plastic Part on a Radiator?
TANKS go bad USUALLY from the use of the WRONG COOLANTS and TANKS are available for only CERTAIN RADIATORS OUT THERE! A good RADIATOR SHOP will know all about this! WRONG COOLANT will melt the plastic in the RAD TANKS1. 2006 Mustang GT 4.6L ticking noise from engine?Does the tick increase with RPM's? What is the mileage? Consistent oil changes? Does it burn oil? A tick can be lots of things and without hearing it or where it is coming from, it can be difficult to tell. Possible things to check: Water pumps can "tick" when they are going bad Loose spark plug (as mentioned) Exhaust leak Vacuum leak Lifters Pulley2. Shoundn't priority one (japan relief) be to power the nuke plants' water pumps so this business will end?The containments are not sealed adequately in some of them to contain enough water to cool the rods...some sh1t is hitting the fan3. My car keeps running hot help!?Water pumps do not go bad and then come back for two days. I would check the tensioner to be sure the belt is not slipping. If you say the fan is coming and turning in the right direction then make sure the fins in the radiator are clean and then the radiator would be my next suspect. Look inside to see if the tubes are clear4. Anus water Pumps ...Ok I really don't know how to ask this......But here goes....?I pour liquid soap up my rear and fart out bubbles5. How much would it cost to install plumbing and electricity at a site that wouldn't originally have these?Many, many dollars is what it will cost. The electricity is dependent on the length of the run from where the power is to where you need it. Figure that you can ask the power company for a reasonable estimate. For water pumps you need either a well or a surface water source. You need to get some books on basic home building and the local regulations regarding home building6. Question about head when talking about water pumps?40 ft of head would be a pressure delivered by the pump if I am reading this right...Head pressure of a tank is determined by the fluid level in the tank, so if you had 40 ft of liquid in the tank you would have 40 ft of head pressure. I will give you a Eng link to convert head to psi.7. My coolant froze up!!! please answer!!-----Asking all you mechanics!!?i could first verify the fundamental issues first till now you spent any money. make certain each and all of the hoses maximum proper to the radiator are tightly linked. If that doesnt fix it i could look for leaks interior the water pump gaskets, perhaps a head gasket, or a leaking radiator. If the motor vehicle blows white smoke out the exhaust that is in many situations a head gasket yet whilst its not blowing white smoke and overheating you should be very nicely. A radiator could be anywere from seventy 5 to a hundred and fifty$ at a junkyard in case you opt to replace it your self. Hoses could be around 10-20 $. Water pumps could be around a hundred. Leaking thermostates could be approximately 10. wish that facilitates.8. Car temperature keeps shooting up, car makes weird bubbling/grinding noise...what is wrong with it?Tanis, You mentioned a bubbling/grinding noise...I would first check if the thermostatically controlled fan (if it has one) is functioning correctly. The second option would be to drain, flush and back flush the radiator/cooling system being alert for any foreign materials (metal/sand/debris/etc) in the cooling fluid. My third suspect would be the water pump. You said you replaced the thermostat and that there is no loss of coolant...to me, that makes the water pump suspect. When you locate and correct your problem I would like to know what it was. An acquaintence of mine had a new car that kept over heating and destroying water pumps. The dealer solved the problem by discovering sand in a block casting void. Good Luck
Garage Fan Selection and Placement
However, I have no idea how to select a placement. Why would I choose ceiling mount vs wall mount? Like is there an "ideal" place to mount the fan? If wall mounted - high or low on the wall? Near a corner or in the middle of the wall? If ceiling mounted, near the center of the room? Corners? Wall centers?The fans you've referenced are fundamentally the same. I.e. the "ceiling" version still is designed to move air horizontally (as opposed to what we usually think of as a "ceiling" fan).I would say that the choice of ceiling vs. wall mount is primarily going to be driven by the exact location you think the fan will be most useful, and the convenience of installation (e.g. where you already have existing wiring). It will have more to do with what's the best location to mount the fan, rather than any particular aspect of operation.Also, I assume oscillating is "better" than fixed (again, the price is only marginally more)? Is just "better airflow"? Are there any downsides?Oscillation is a question of how you want to use the fan. An oscillating fan does a couple of things that a stationary fan does not:Bottom line on those two points: there's a reason the fans are offered in different configurations, and the reason is mainly because different users have different needs. You'll have to think about how the space is to be used, how you expect to use the fan, and what would be involved in installing the fan, and use that information to drive your decision. Within the four-option matrix (i.e. the four combinations of oscillating or not and wall or ceiling mount), there is no best option overall. It just depends.As far as locating the fan, again that will depend on your specific need. If you want a stationary fan to blow on a particular spot, then a location at the right distance from that spot where the fan can be properly positioned would be best. If you just want to mix the air in the room, an oscillating fan positioned near a wall, or maybe up to 1/3rd of the width of the room (depending on how large the space actually is), might be better.At the end of the day, you might find that practical considerations related to where you have power and structure available for mounting are the primary factor.I note that in one comment, you mention that there is living space above. That could also be a consideration. It might be easier to control noise infiltrating the living space if you mount the fan on the wall rather than the ceiling. Assuming that's a concern, of course.Last gotcha - I have a door to an air conditioned house. Would keeping that door open while working (in a further attempt to cool the garage) be useful? If so, would it change the placement choice?Unless you plan to hang the fan directly in the doorway, and preferably on the cold side of the doorway, it's unlikely that the fan would help much with mixing the air conditioned air with the warm garage air.On a broader note: it's important keep in mind what a fan can and cannot do. The fan is not going to change the temperature of the room. In fact, running the electric motor is going to increase the average temperature a hair.What the fan can do is even out the hot spots in the room, if any (e.g. you are using welding equipment, or doing something else that generates heat, or maybe there's a spot in the room that gets a lot more sunlight), and can provide a breeze to aid in cooling a person's body, taking advantage of the body's own mechanisms for dealing with heat (i.e. sweating and dilating blood vessels).Even with a fan, if you're working and the room is hot, you're going to feel hot. Staying hydrated will be at least as important as any other consideration. If you really want to cool the room, you need something else that will actually change the temperature, rather than just your perception of it.For somewhere between the same price as the fan you're looking at and less than double that price, you could get a window-mount or portable A/C unit. At the higher end of that range, you could even get a dual-mode (i.e. heat pump) model that will heat the space in the winter if needed.At the lower of the scale, you also have the option of exhaust fans. Depending on the climate in your area and why the garage gets hot in the first place and whether you can provide an effective source of make-up air for one, an exhaust fan could be used to keep the space cool enough that a fan to actually move air in the space isn't needed, or at least would be a lot more effective.Don't get me wrong: fans that just move air around have their use. I find them especially useful for spaces where conditioning isn't even possible (e.g. the space isn't even fully enclosed), as well as an accessory to be used in combination with conditioning methods (because it's always still helpful to mix the air in the room, conditioned or not). But if your primary complaint is just that the space is hot, a fan might not be the most cost-effective solution from a price/performance perspective, even taking into account the significantly reduced operating costs as compared to A/CI would like to put a fan in a 2 car garage woodshop (it's getting awfully hot to work in in the summer). I was thinking something like this: The prices seem marginally more expensive for the bigger motor and the bigger blades, so perhaps a 1/3 HP 30" variety.However, I have no idea how to select a placement. Why would I choose ceiling mount vs wall mount? Like is there an "ideal" place to mount the fan? If wall mounted - high or low on the wall? Near a corner or in the middle of the wall? If ceiling mounted, near the center of the room? Corners? Wall centers?Also, I assume oscillating is "better" than fixed (again, the price is only marginally more)? Is just "better airflow"? Are there any downsides?Last gotcha - I have a door to an air conditioned house. Would keeping that door open while working (in a further attempt to cool the garage) be useful? If so, would it change the placement choice?Any tips would be appreciated!·OTHER ANSWER:I would like to put a fan in a 2 car garage woodshop (it's getting awfully hot to work in in the summer). I was thinking something like this: The prices seem marginally more expensive for the bigger motor and the bigger blades, so perhaps a 1/3 HP 30" variety.However, I have no idea how to select a placement. Why would I choose ceiling mount vs wall mount? Like is there an "ideal" place to mount the fan? If wall mounted - high or low on the wall? Near a corner or in the middle of the wall? If ceiling mounted, near the center of the room? Corners? Wall centers?Also, I assume oscillating is "better" than fixed (again, the price is only marginally more)? Is just "better airflow"? Are there any downsides?Last gotcha - I have a door to an air conditioned house. Would keeping that door open while working (in a further attempt to cool the garage) be useful? If so, would it change the placement choice?Any tips would be appreciated!
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