Knowledge About Explorer 1 - Championships and Accomplishments of Explorer 1

Championships and accomplishments of explorer 1

All Japan Pro Wrestling

All Asia Tag Team Championship (2 times) with The Dynamite Kid (1), and Wolf Hawkfield (1)

World Tag Team Championship (1 time) with Taiy Kea

World's Strongest Tag Determination League Fair Play Award (1990, 1991) with Dynamite Kid

Canadian Rocky Mountain Wrestling

CRMW Heavyweight Championship (2 Times)

Pro Wrestling Illustrated

PWI ranked him 116 of the 500 best singles wrestlers in the PWI 500 in 1997

Stampede Wrestling

Stampede British Commonwealth Mid-Heavyweight Championship (4 times)

Canadian Wrestling Hall of Fame

Class of 2016

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Feilden baronets, of Feniscowles (1846) of explorer 1

Sir William Feilden, 1st Baronet (17721850)

Sir William Henry Feilden, 2nd Baronet (18121879)

Sir William Leyland Feilden, 3rd Baronet (18351912)

Sir William Henry Feilden, 4th Baronet (18661946)

Sir William Morton Buller Feilden, MC, 5th Baronet (18931976)

Sir Henry Wemyss Feilden, 6th Baronet (19162010)

Sir Henry Rudyard Feilden, 7th Baronet (born 1951)The heir apparent to the baronetcy is William Henry Feilden (born 1983), eldest son of the 7th Baronet.

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Joo Infante of explorer 1

Joo Infante (fl. 15th century) was a Portuguese explorer of the African coast. He accompanied Bartolomeu Dias in his journey around the Cape of Good Hope in 1487/1488 by leading a second caravel, the So Pantaleo (named after Saint Pantaleon).

Some places in South Africa are or were named after him:

The Rio do Infante, now the Great Fish River, Eastern Cape

Cape Infanta, Western Cape

Infanta, Western Cape: a small settlement

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Heliotropium pannifolium of explorer 1

Heliotropium pannifolium, the Saint Helena heliotrope, is now extinct but was formerly a hairy-leaved small shrub up to 1 m in height. it was only seen once, by the explorer W. Burchell in Broad Gut, Saint Helena (ca. 1808) and has never been seen again. Human impact on the island of Saint Helena was severe and the Saint Helena heliotrope is one of several extinct plants from that island (see List of extinct plants).

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Feilden baronets of explorer 1

The Feilden Baronetcy, of Feniscowles in the County Palatine of Lancaster, is a title in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 21 July 1846 for William Feilden, Member of Parliament for Blackburn between 1832 and 1847. He sat as a Liberal from 1832 to 1841 then as a Conservative from then until 1847.

Henry Wemyss Feilden, second son of the second Baronet, was an Arctic explorer.

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Further reading of explorer 1

Hodges, Ronald W., et al., eds. (1983). Check List of the Lepidoptera of America North of Mexico, xxiv 284.

Opler, Paul A. (1999). A Field Guide to Western Butterflies, Second Edition, xiv 540.

Pelham, Jonathan P. (2008). "A catalogue of the butterflies of the United States and Canada with a complete bibliography of the descriptive and systematic literature". Journal of Research on the Lepidoptera, vol. 40, xiv 658.

Arnett, Ross H. (2000). American Insects: A Handbook of the Insects of America North of Mexico. CRC Press.

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Early years and education of explorer 1

Mary French was born May 10, 1847, at Bridgewater, Pennsylvania. Her father was Joseph French, a civil engineer, and her mother Elizabeth J. French (ne Poorman), a spiritualist who later practiced "galvanic medicine" in Boston, as did her sister, Dr. Belle French Patterson.

She was educated in the United States and overseas, studying art and developing into an author and ethnologist.

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Kirsana of explorer 1

Kirsana (Arabic: ) is a town in northwestern Syria, discovered by German explorer in 1885. Kirsana is administratively part of the Latakia Governorate, located north of Latakia. Nearby localities include Al-Shamiyah and Burj Islam to the north, Burj al-Qasab to the southwest and Sitmarkho to the south. According to the Syria Central Bureau of Statistics, Kirsana had a population of 5,499 in the 2004 census. Its inhabitants are predominantly Alawites.

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Vrh Estate of explorer 1

The Vrh Estate (in older sources also Kolenik, German: Auenthal) stands 1 km west of kocjan. By the 20th century it was reduced to a large farm owned by the Rupar family of Gorika Vas pri kocjanu. The manor was built before 1667 by Wolfgang Blande. It passed through many owners over the following centuries and was purchased by the Rupar family in 1928.

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Avich Falls of explorer 1

Avich Falls near Dalavich in Argyll and Bute is a waterfall in Scotland.

The River Avich flows about 1 mile (1.6km) down the steep glacial valley of Loch Awe from Loch Avich and the falls are near the foot of the gully. There are several falls but the main one is of three cascades crossing open rocks. The falls are in the Inverliever Forest of the Barnaline estate, one of the first Forestry Commission estates in Scotland.

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Lestes rectangularis of explorer 1

Lestes rectangularis is a species of damselfly in the family Lestidae, the spreadwings. It is known by the common name slender spreadwing. It is native to eastern North America, including eastern Canada and the United States.

This damselfly is long and thin. The body is black with a pale blue face, and the wings have yellow edges. The female is larger, with paler yellow on the wings. This species lives along springs and drying ponds.

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Dneti, Vaslui of explorer 1

Dneti is a commune in Vaslui County, Western Moldavia, Romania. It is composed of six villages: Bereasa, Booaia, Dneti, Emil Racovi, Rcani and Ttrni.

The village of Emil Racovi, formerly called urneti, is named after explorer Emil Racovi, who spent his childhood there. The physician Grigore T. Popa was also born in the village.

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Krosnowice of explorer 1

Krosnowice krsnvits (formerly Rankowo, German: Rengersdorf) is a village in the administrative district of Gmina Kodzko, within Kodzko County, Lower Silesian Voivodeship, in south-western Poland. Prior to 1945 it was in Germany.

It lies approximately 6 kilometres (4mi) south of Kodzko, and 87 kilometres (54mi) south of the regional capital Wrocaw.

The village has a population of 2,954.

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Valvata virens of explorer 1

Valvata virens is a species of freshwater snail in the family Valvatidae. It is known by the common name emerald valvata.

This species is endemic to California in the United States. Reports from adjacent states are invalid. Of the two valid occurrences reported in California, at least one is extirpated and the other is in an unknown location. NatureServe has listed the species with the conservation status "possibly extinct".

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Afon Iwrch of explorer 1

Coordinates: 524836N 31606W / 52.8100N 3.2683W / 52.8100; -3.2683

The Afon Iwrch is a river near Llanrhaeadr-ym-Mochnant in Clwyd, Wales. It is a tributary of the River Tanat and is 8.9 miles (14.4km) in length. Its headwaters lie on the eastern slopes of Cadair Berwyn, the highest peak of the Berwyn range, and the river flows broadly southeastwards to join the River Tanat, itself a tributary of the River Vyrnwy.

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Nihiru of explorer 1

Nihiru, or Nikia, is one of the Tuamotu atolls in French Polynesia. It is a relatively small atoll located 49km to the east of Makemo Atoll and 30km northeast of Marutea Atoll.

Nihiru Atoll is roughly triangular in shape. It measures 14km in length with a maximum width of 10.5km. Its lagoon has an area of 79km.

Nihiru had 11 inhabitants in 2012, most of whom originated from Taenga.

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Broad Hinton and Winterbourne Bassett of explorer 1

Coordinates: 512823N 15107W / 51.473N 1.852W / 51.473; -1.852

Broad Hinton and Winterbourne Bassett is a parish council area comprising the adjacent civil parishes of Broad Hinton and Winterbourne Bassett, in the English county of Wiltshire.

The two civil parishes elect a single grouped parish council. They fall within the area of the Wiltshire Council unitary authority, which is responsible for almost all significant local government functions.

In the census of 2011, the combined population of the parishes was 809.

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Paulo Dias de Novais of explorer 1

Paulo Dias de Novais (c. 1510 9 May 1589), a fidalgo of the Royal Household, was a Portuguese colonizer of Africa in the 16th century and the first Captain-Governor of Portuguese Angola. He was the grandson of the explorer Bartolomeu Dias.

Novais arrived in what is now Angola on 11 February 1575. Attracted by the prospect of the famous silver mines of Cambambe, he founded the settlement of So Paulo de Luanda, near the island of Luanda.

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kocjan, kocjan of explorer 1

kocjan (pronouncedktsjan; German: Sankt Cantian) is a settlement in the traditional region of Lower Carniola in southeastern Slovenia, best known as the birthplace of the Slovene missionary Ignatius Knoblecher (18191858). It is the seat of the Municipality of kocjan and the Local Community of kocjan within the municipality. The Municipality of kocjan is now included in the Southeast Slovenia Statistical Region.

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Demographics of explorer 1

EthnicityThe Hidayapuram 1 Grama Niladhari Division has a Moor majority (99.4%). In comparison, the Pothuvil Divisional Secretariat (which contains the Hidayapuram 1 Grama Niladhari Division) has a Moor majority (78.2%) and a significant Sri Lankan Tamil population (18.8%)

ReligionThe Hidayapuram 1 Grama Niladhari Division has a Muslim majority (99.4%). In comparison, the Pothuvil Divisional Secretariat (which contains the Hidayapuram 1 Grama Niladhari Division) has a Muslim majority (78.2%) and a significant Hindu population (15.5%)

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Kingston Brook of explorer 1

Kingston Brook is a small river in central England. It arises near Old Dalby, Leicestershire on the northern edge of the ridge running from Normanton-on-Soar, Nottinghamshire to Belvoir, Leicestershire. It runs through Willoughby on the Wolds, to the south of Wysall (where it picks up a number of minor tributaries), Costock, East Leake (where it is joined by Sheepwash Brook), West Leake and meets the River Soar near Kingston-on-Soar.

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Rawlinson Ranges of explorer 1

Rawlinson Ranges is a mountain range in the far east of central Western Australia, to the west of the Petermann Ranges, with which it is commonly associated. Both features were named by Ernest Giles, the first European explorer to visit the area.

The range runs roughly east from Lake Christopher for approximately 40 kilometres (25mi). The Giles Weather Station is located a few kilometres further east.

The area has been considered a possible site of the fabled Lasseter's Reef.

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Illington of explorer 1

Illington is a village and former civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The population is now included in the civil parish of Wretham. The village is 6.2 miles north east of Thetford, 24 miles west south west of Norwich and 92.

3 miles north east of London. The nearest railway station is at Thetford for the Breckland Line which runs between Cambridge and Norwich. The nearest airport is Norwich International Airport

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Alabama vertigo of explorer 1

The Alabama vertigo (Vertigo alabamensis) is a species of land snail in the family Vertiginidae, the whorl snails. It is native to the United States, where it occurs in parts of North Carolina, South Carolina, Alabama, Florida, and Georgia.

The snail lives in pine savanna, bay forest, and bog habitat. The young hatch in spring. Adult shells can be found during spring and early summer, but they are mostly gone by late summer.

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Legacy of explorer 1

Two weeks after his death from a heart attack on October 1st, 1978, Congressman George H. Mahon made a tribute to Wade in front of the United States House of Representatives in praise of Wade's achievements, his "enthusiasm for life, his Christian dedication and his youthful spirit".

Mount Wade is named for Wade. It was first discovered by Roald Amundsen in 1911. It has the highest elevation of any of the Prince Olav Mountains, at 4,085 m (13,402 ft).

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Grnligrotta of explorer 1

Grnligrotta (or Grnligrotten) is a karst cave in the municipality of Rana in Nordland, Norway. It is located in the valley of Rvassdalen, and was first explored in 1914. It has a total depth of 107 metres (351ft) and explored length of 2 kilometres (1.

2mi). It is probably connected to the nearby Setergrotta. The cave is equipped with artificial lights and open for tourists.

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Jean-Louis Michel (oceanographer) of explorer 1

Jean-Louis Michel (born 1945) is a French oceanographer and engineer.

He discovered subsea intervention in 1969 with the French Navy as an officer at the Groupe des Bathyscaphes headed by Captain Georges Houot. In 1985, Jean-Louis Michel (along with marine geologist Robert Ballard) led a team of French and American explorers who found the wreckage of the RMS Titanic.

Robert Ballard mentions in an interview with the Forbes that Jean-Louis Michel rarely gets enough credit for co-discovering the Titanic.

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Neoditrema ransonnetii of explorer 1

Neoditrema ransonnetii is a species of surfperch native to the Pacific coasts of Korea and Japan. This species grows to a length of 13 centimetres (5.1in) FL. This species is the only known member of its genus. The specific name honours the Austrian diplomat, painter, lithographer, biologist and explorer Eugen von Ransonnet-Villez (1838-1926), who obtained the type specimens in Japan.

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Know About Explorer 1
An Introduction to explorer 1Myrica inodora is a plant species native to the coastal plains on the northern shore of the Gulf of Mexico, in the Florida Panhandle, the extreme southern parts of Alabama and Mississippi, eastern Louisiana and southwestern Georgia. Common names include scentless bayberry, odorless bayberry, odorless wax-myrtle, waxberry, candleberry, and waxtree. It grows in swamps, bogs, pond edges and stream banks.Myrica inodora is an evergreen, monoecious shrub or small tree up to 7 m (23 feet) tall. Leaves are ovate to elliptic, up to 12cm (5 inches) long, lacking the odor characteristic of other members of the genus. Fruits are spherical or nearly so, up to 8mm (0.3 inches) in diameter, covered with whitish wax and glandular hairs.What was the name of the first American satellite? of explorer 1The first from the U.S. was called Explorer 1. The U.S. Army Ballistic Missile Agency blasted Explorer 1 into orbit from the Air Force Missile and Test Center at Cape Canaveral, Florida, on January 31, 1958. The Army used a modified Jupiter-C military rocket to send the tiny satellite aloft. With Explorer 1, the United States showed it could compete with the Soviet Union, which had launched two artificial satellites to orbit within the previous three months. The Soviets had electrified the public when it launched the world's first human-made satellite, Sputnik 1, on October 4, 1957. The rocket project was headed by Wernher von Braun at the U.S. Army Ballistic Missile Agency headquarters at Huntsville, Alabama. The Explorer 1 satellite was built by William Pickering and a team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. At the State University of Iowa, physicist James Van Allen and graduate student Wei Ching Lin built the cosmic ray Geiger counters that were the science instruments inside Explorer. Explorer weighed 18 lbs., which compared with a weight of 1,200-lbs. for Sputnik 2, which also carried a live dog to orbit. However, Van Allen's science package inside Explorer discovered a previously-unknown radiation belt around our planet. It was named the Van Allen Belt and was recognized as the greatest science contribution of the International Geophysical Year (1958).Design of explorer 1Both spacecraft had a polygonal shape, and were approximately 137cm in diameter and 115cm high. Each also had a 200-cm radio antenna and two 6-meter booms which were needed to distance some of the equipment from the main body of the spacecraft. They were stacked on top of each other and launched aboard a Delta 3000 booster rocket. Upon reaching orbit, the two spacecraft departed from the booster and entered separate orbits. Dynamics Explorer 1 was placed into a high altitude elliptical orbit, while DE-2 was put into a lower orbit that was also more circular.Dynamics Explorer 1 InstrumentationDynamics Explorer 1 carried the following instruments:Plasma Wave Instrument (PWI), which measured auroral kilometric radiation, auroral hiss, Z-mode radiation, and narrow band electromagnetic emissions.The Spin-scan Auroral Imager (SAI)The Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS)Energetic Ion Composition Spectrometer (EICS)High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI)Magnetic Field Observations Triaxial Fluxgate Magnetometer (MAG-A)In addition, there were two Earth-based investigations, Auroral Physics Theory and Controlled and Naturally Occurring Wave Particle Interactions Theory. The later involved broadcasting very-low-frequency/low-frequency (0.5-200 kHz) signals from a transmitter located at Siple, Antarctica, which were received by the PWI instrument on Dynamics Explorer 1.Dynamics Explorer 2 InstrumentationThe Dynamics Explorer 2 carried the following instruments for data collection:A Retarding Potential Analyzer, which measured the ion flux along the velocity vector of the spacecraft. This data was then used to determine the ion temperature and drift velocity in the spacecraft's area.An Ion drift meter, which measured the ambient ion drift.A MagnetometerA Vector Electric Field Instrument An aurora as seen by one of the Dynamics ExplorersA Neutral Atmosphere Composition SpectrometerA Wind and Temperature Spectrometer (WATS), which measured the zonal and vertical components of the neutral winds, as well as the kinetic temperature. (The zonal wind component is the component in the direction of lines of latitude - i.e., east-west.) The WATS instrument on DE-2 is one of the few satellite instruments which has measured thermosphere vertical wind speeds, with the Neutral Atmosphere Temperature Instrument (NATE) on Atmospheric Explorer C (AE-C) being one other.A Fabry-Pérot interferometer (FPI), which measured the meridional component of the neutral winds. (The meridional wind component is the component in the direction of lines of longitude - i.e., north-south.)A Low-Altitude Plasma InstrumentA Langmuir probe
Knowledge About Explorer 1
1. Career of explorer 1 Antarctic expeditions and researchWade was a member of the second Antarctic expedition led by the Admiral Richard E. Byrd in 1933. While there, he was part of a 77-day sled journey into Marie Byrd Land. The field work on this expedition was later the foundation of his doctoral dissertation. Wade was then selected by Byrd to take the role of chief scientist for his third Antarctic expedition. On this expedition he took two students with him, a practice he would continue in his later expeditions. He was geologist with the Byrd Antarctic Expedition (1933-35), senior scientist at West Base of the U.S. Antarctic Service (USAS) (1939-41), and leader of two Texas Tech Shackleton Glacier Parties (1962-63 and 1964-65) and Senior Scientist U.S. Antarctic Research Program (USARP) Marie Byrd Land Survey, 1966-67 and 1967-68. Wade personally named several Antarctic mountains and ridges whilst he worked as leader of the Texas Tech Shackleton Glacier Party, 196263. These include: Cathedral Peaks (8444S 17540W / 84.733S 175.667W / -84.733; -175.667), a rugged mountain mass that Wade perceived to have spires, resembling a cathedral, when viewed from the Shackleton Glacier.Lubbock Ridge (8452S 17525W / 84.867S 175.417W / -84.867; -175.417) a high ridge around 5 nautical miles (9 km) long, which extends west from Mount Wade and terminates in a steep bluff at the east side of Shackleton Glacier. Wade named this ridge for Lubbock, where Texas Tech University is located.Mount Kenyon (8510S 17452W / 85.167S 174.867W / -85.167; -174.867) a mountain, 2,260 metres (7,400 ft) high, which stands 1 nautical mile (2 km) northwest of Shenk Peak in the northern part of the Cumulus Hills. He named the mountain after Kenyon College, Ohio, which he had attended almost 30 years previously to the expedition.AcademiaDuring his PhD programme, Wade worked as a instructor in geology at the University of Delaware. Wade accepted a similar position at the Miami University in his home state of Ohio in 1936. He then received his Doctor of Philosophy degree from Johns Hopkins University in 1937. He was head of the Geology department at Texas Tech University, but resigned the position in 1964 to focus on active Antarctic research. His successor in the position, Richard Maddox, later said: For Al, the paperwork and meetings were a waste of the time he could have spent in teaching and research. ------ 2. Ivory trader (18861889) of explorer 1 In 1885 King Leopold II of Belgian founded the Congo Free State and began to replace non-Belgian members of the Association Internationale du Congo with Belgians. Swinburne was dismissed in 1886 and returned to England, taking his two boys with him. He found work as an ivory trader under Henry Shelton Sanford. He returned later that year, bringing Disasi with him. He found a plentiful supply of ivory on sale in Kinshasa, and at one point had 60 tusks weighing 10 to 50 kilograms (22 to 110 lb). When he had raised enough money he bought a steamer so he could sail upriver and buy ivory at far lower prices. Stanley was charged with leading the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition, which was to travel up the Congo River and overland to Equatoria rather than take the shorter route from the east coast. He met Swinburne in Paris in late January 1887. Swinburne was returning in the Congo from leave, explained to Stanley how run down the king's flottila had become, had hinted that he might lend him the company steamer Florida. When Stanley reached Boma he was told by Louis Valcke that largest steamer, the Stanley, was damaged, the En Avant had no engine and the Royal was rotten. On 1 April 1887 Swinburne lent Stanley the Florida for use as a barge, despite knowing his boss Sanford would be furious about the loan. In 1889, less than three years after his trip to Europe, his servant Disasi Makulo was with Swinburne when he contracted gastritis. He got ugly boils on his legs, and his condition quickly got worse. Disasi and a friend made a hammock to carry him to Boma. On the way they stopped at the mission station in Gombe, where the British Baptist George Grenfell took care of the invalid for two weeks. When that did not help, they travelled on to the Dutch factory in Ndunga, where Swinburne died. He just 30 years old. According to Disasi, "The whites we had met at that station immediately began preparing for the funeral. The ceremony was attended by all whites, dressed in fine costumes, and a large group of blacks. That day we thought the world was infinitely bitter, and our thoughts froze, for we did not know if we would ever receive any new support in life." At the age of 18, Disasi Makulo became an assistant to the missionary George Grenfell. ------ 3. Biography of explorer 1 Schmidl was the son of a wealthy merchant, and received a good education. He entered military service and took part 1534 as a Landsknecht under Pedro de Mendoza in an expedition to today's Argentina (Ro de la Plata). He also accompanied Juan de Ayolas on his first trip in quest of provisions, and afterward went with Ayolas in his expedition up Paraguay River, and was one of the soldiers that were left with Domingo Irala in charge of the vessels in Puerto la Candelaria (modern Fuerte Olimpo). When Cabeza de Vaca was deposed in April 1544, Schmidel sustained Irala, who was the new governor, and in 1546 accompanied him in his expedition to Peru as far as the foot of the Andes, where he was despatched with Nuo de Chaves to President La Gasca. He accompanied Irala on his last unfortunate expedition of 1550. He became a founder of Buenos Aires. His journey led him across the Ro Paran and Ro Paraguay and into today's Paraguay, where he helped to found Asuncin. From there he undertook several expeditions in the Gran Chaco, which led him into southeast Bolivia. In 1552, on learning of the death of his elder brother to whose estate he was to succeed, Schmidl obtained his discharge. In Seville, he presented to the council of the Indies letters from Irala with the report of his discoveries, and arrived toward the close of 1554 in Straubing, where he afterward resided. He had kept a diary during his wanderings, and wrote a narrative of his adventures under the title of Wahre Geschichte einer merkwrdigen Reise, gemacht durch Ulrich Schmidel von Straubingen, in America oder der Neuen Welt, von 1534 bis 1554, wo man findet alle seine Leiden in 19 Jahren, und die Beschreibung der Lnder und merkwrdigen Vlker die er gesehen, von ihm selbst geschrieben (The true story of a noteworthy trip made by Ulrich Schmidel von Straubingen in America or the New World from 1534 to 1554, where will be found all his troubles of 19 years and the description of lands and noteworthy peoples he saw, described by himself; Frankfort, 1557), of which a Latin version appeared in Nuremberg in 1599 as Vera historia, etc. Henri Ternaux-Compans published a translation of the work in his Voyages, relations et mmoires originaux pour servir l'histoire de la dcouverte de l'Amrique, recueil de documents sur la Floride (20 vol., 18371841) and Andrs Gonzlez de Barcia in his Historiadores primitivos de Indias. Schmidel thus became the first historian of Argentina. Much of his account in the German language overlaps with an account written in Spanish by lvar Nez Cabeza de Vaca, who was adelantado of the Governorate of the Ro de la Plata between 1540 and 1545. Their accounts, one by a German mercenary, another by a Spanish nobleman, offer stark differences in point of view.:3540 His narrative gives the names and tells of the habits and manner of living of many Indian nations that were extinct a century later. Perhaps the most fascinating parts of his accounts are those that attribute cannibalism not to the South American natives, but rather to the desperate conquistadors who were unsuited for survival in the rough climate, and would frequently consume one another in an effort to escape starvation. A particularly notable account states that Spaniards who were hung, and while barely dead, were hacked up by their fellow countrymen, and devoured.:37 After his return to Straubing with a few pieces of booty, he inherited the fortune of his deceased brother, and became a councilman. Because of religious strife he had to leave Straubing and went in 1562 to Regensburg, where he died around 1579.
Introduction to Explorer 1
1. Hippalus of explorer 1 Hippalus (Ancient Greek: ) was a Greek navigator and merchant who probably lived in the 1st century BCE. He is sometimes conjectured to have been the captain of the Greek explorer Eudoxus of Cyzicus' ship. The writer of the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea credited Hippalus with discovering the direct route from the Red Sea to Tamilakam over the Indian Ocean by plotting the scheme of the sea and the correct location of the trade ports along the Indian coast. Pliny the Elder claimed that Hippalus discovered not the route but the monsoon wind also called Hippalus (the south-west monsoon wind). Most historians have tried to reconcile the reports by stating that knowledge of the monsoon winds was necessary to use the direct route, but the historian Andr Tchernia explains that Plinius' connection between the wind and the navigator was based on common pronunciation: in the Hellenistic Era the name of the wind was written as Hypalus, only in Roman times the spelling Hippalus came in use. The wind had already been known in Hellenistic times and had before been used by Himyarite (Southern Arabian Semites) and Indian sailors to cross the Indian Ocean. To understand the importance of Hippalus' discovery we have to know that before him Greek geographers thought that the Indian coast stretched from west to east. Hippalus was probably the first (in the west) to recognize the north-south direction of India's west coast. Only someone who has this insight will think crossing the Indian Ocean might be a faster way to south India than following the coastline. The use of Hippalus' direct route greatly contributed to the prosperity of trade contacts between the Roman province of Aegyptus and India from the 1st century BCE onwards. From Red Sea ports like Berenice large ships crossed the Indian Ocean to the Tamil kingdoms of the Pandyas, Cholas and Cheras in present-day Kerala and Tamil Nadu. In modern times a crater on the moon was named after the navigator. He is also a prominent character in L. Sprague de Camp's novel about Eudoxus, The Golden Wind. ------ 2. Ivory trader (18861889) of explorer 1 In 1885 King Leopold II of Belgian founded the Congo Free State and began to replace non-Belgian members of the Association Internationale du Congo with Belgians. Swinburne was dismissed in 1886 and returned to England, taking his two boys with him. He found work as an ivory trader under Henry Shelton Sanford. He returned later that year, bringing Disasi with him. He found a plentiful supply of ivory on sale in Kinshasa, and at one point had 60 tusks weighing 10 to 50 kilograms (22 to 110 lb). When he had raised enough money he bought a steamer so he could sail upriver and buy ivory at far lower prices. Stanley was charged with leading the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition, which was to travel up the Congo River and overland to Equatoria rather than take the shorter route from the east coast. He met Swinburne in Paris in late January 1887. Swinburne was returning in the Congo from leave, explained to Stanley how run down the king's flottila had become, had hinted that he might lend him the company steamer Florida. When Stanley reached Boma he was told by Louis Valcke that largest steamer, the Stanley, was damaged, the En Avant had no engine and the Royal was rotten. On 1 April 1887 Swinburne lent Stanley the Florida for use as a barge, despite knowing his boss Sanford would be furious about the loan. In 1889, less than three years after his trip to Europe, his servant Disasi Makulo was with Swinburne when he contracted gastritis. He got ugly boils on his legs, and his condition quickly got worse. Disasi and a friend made a hammock to carry him to Boma. On the way they stopped at the mission station in Gombe, where the British Baptist George Grenfell took care of the invalid for two weeks. When that did not help, they travelled on to the Dutch factory in Ndunga, where Swinburne died. He just 30 years old. According to Disasi, "The whites we had met at that station immediately began preparing for the funeral. The ceremony was attended by all whites, dressed in fine costumes, and a large group of blacks. That day we thought the world was infinitely bitter, and our thoughts froze, for we did not know if we would ever receive any new support in life." At the age of 18, Disasi Makulo became an assistant to the missionary George Grenfell. ------ 3. Career of explorer 1 Antarctic expeditions and researchWade was a member of the second Antarctic expedition led by the Admiral Richard E. Byrd in 1933. While there, he was part of a 77-day sled journey into Marie Byrd Land. The field work on this expedition was later the foundation of his doctoral dissertation. Wade was then selected by Byrd to take the role of chief scientist for his third Antarctic expedition. On this expedition he took two students with him, a practice he would continue in his later expeditions. He was geologist with the Byrd Antarctic Expedition (1933-35), senior scientist at West Base of the U.S. Antarctic Service (USAS) (1939-41), and leader of two Texas Tech Shackleton Glacier Parties (1962-63 and 1964-65) and Senior Scientist U.S. Antarctic Research Program (USARP) Marie Byrd Land Survey, 1966-67 and 1967-68. Wade personally named several Antarctic mountains and ridges whilst he worked as leader of the Texas Tech Shackleton Glacier Party, 196263. These include: Cathedral Peaks (8444S 17540W / 84.733S 175.667W / -84.733; -175.667), a rugged mountain mass that Wade perceived to have spires, resembling a cathedral, when viewed from the Shackleton Glacier.Lubbock Ridge (8452S 17525W / 84.867S 175.417W / -84.867; -175.417) a high ridge around 5 nautical miles (9 km) long, which extends west from Mount Wade and terminates in a steep bluff at the east side of Shackleton Glacier. Wade named this ridge for Lubbock, where Texas Tech University is located.Mount Kenyon (8510S 17452W / 85.167S 174.867W / -85.167; -174.867) a mountain, 2,260 metres (7,400 ft) high, which stands 1 nautical mile (2 km) northwest of Shenk Peak in the northern part of the Cumulus Hills. He named the mountain after Kenyon College, Ohio, which he had attended almost 30 years previously to the expedition.AcademiaDuring his PhD programme, Wade worked as a instructor in geology at the University of Delaware. Wade accepted a similar position at the Miami University in his home state of Ohio in 1936. He then received his Doctor of Philosophy degree from Johns Hopkins University in 1937. He was head of the Geology department at Texas Tech University, but resigned the position in 1964 to focus on active Antarctic research. His successor in the position, Richard Maddox, later said: For Al, the paperwork and meetings were a waste of the time he could have spent in teaching and research. ------ 4. Professional wrestling career of explorer 1 Joint promotions (19821985)Hindley was trained by his uncle Ted Betley, initially in Winwick Warrington, and then Port Erin, Isle of Man. He made his debut in January 1982 at the age of 16 at Gloucester Leisure Centre, under the name John Savage. He wrestled in the United Kingdom for two years, having regular TV bouts with Alan Kilby and Drew McDonald before moving over to Canada with his wife Jane. Stampede Wrestling (19851989)Joining Stampede Wrestling in 1985, Hindley was billed as Davey Boy Smith's brother, Johnny Smith. He was there involved in a storyline in 1988 where they had a heated rivalry, eventually his storyline sister and brother-in-law Diana Hart and Owen Hart also got involved after Johnny disrespected the Hart family. In February 1989, he began feuding with Dynamite Kid after interfering during a British Bulldogs-Karachi Vice rematch, attacking him from behind and cutting his hair. In May, Dynamite had turned on Davey Boy Smith, and Johnny began teaming with Dynamite as The British Bruisers, feuding with Davey Boy and Chris Benoit. New Japan, All Japan, and Indies (19872003)In 1987, he went on his first Japanese tour in New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW). In February 1989, he followed The Dynamite Kid to wrestle for All Japan Pro Wrestling (AJPW) and replaced Davey Boy Smith as Dynamite Kid's tag team partner in September 1990, reforming the tag team: The British Bruisers. In between tours in All Japan, Hindley would wrestle the independent circuit in the United States and Canada, as well as brief stints in Extreme Championship Wrestling. On 10 April 2003, Hindley collapsed prior to his match at an All Japan Pro Wrestling show. Paramedics were called to the Hiroshima Arena and Hindley was rushed to a local hospital, having lost feeling in some parts of his body, but was in stable condition at a local Japanese hospital. Some believe this incident to be connected to a previous injury. Sometime after the incident, Hindley retired. He was planning to make a comeback in March 2004 for IWA Japan, but chose to remain retired due to health reasons. ------ 5. William Moor of explorer 1 William Moor (died 1765) was a British sailor and explorer associated with the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) and the annual supply ships to the bay area. Moor was involved, under the supervision of his cousin, Christopher Middleton, with voyages to the bay from about 1730 to 1741 and carried out increasingly important duties during that period. In 1741 he and Middleton left the HBC's employ and Moor was given command of HMS Discovery to aid his cousin in HMS Furnace in a search for the Northwest Passage. They overwintered at Prince of Wales Fort where sickness plagued the crews. Their survey of the shoreline and tides of the west side of Hudson Bay was not particularly successful. Moor and Middleton and the 17411742 expedition were under the scrutiny of Arthur Dobbs, an opponent of the HBC monopoly of the bay area. Middleton was accused of protecting the HBC monopoly and Moor took the side of Dobbs. In 1746, Moor was in command of a private discovery expedition to Hudson Bay funded by Dobbs and others. After a short and unsuccessful period of exploration by the two ships, they decided to overwinter at the HBC post at York Factory. The next summer some good exploration was carried out on the western shore and discovered Chesterfield Inlet but did not fully explore it. He also examined Rankin Inlet and Wager Bay. At a point, after further exploration, illness and threats of mutiny turned the expedition for home. Moor's competence as a commander was called into question on his return. There is little doubt that his weakness and uncertainty affected the expedition but the unhappiness of the investors was also because he refused to engage in illegal trade on their behalf. Moor appears to have retired around this time. His explorations did add significantly to the knowledge of the area despite his problems with the command of the expedition.
Introduction to Explorer 1
1. Thomas Blakiston of explorer 1 Thomas Wright Blakiston (27 December 1832 15 October 1891) was an English explorer and naturalist. Born in Lymington, Hampshire, Blakiston was the son of Major John Blakiston, second son of Sir Matthew Blakiston, 2nd Baronet (see Blakiston baronets for earlier history of the family). His mother was Jane, daughter of Reverend Thomas Wright, Rector of Market Bosworth, Leicestershire. Blakiston explored western Canada with the Palliser Expedition between 1857 and 1859. Mount Blakiston, the highest point in Waterton Lakes National Park was named for him in 1858. In 1861 he traveled up the Yangtze River in China, going further than any Westerner before him. He spent the next part of his life in Japan and became one of the major naturalists in that country. He moved to the United States in 1885. Blakiston died aged 58 of pneumonia in October 1891 while in San Diego, California and is buried in Greenlawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Blakiston was the first person to notice that animals in Hokkaid, Japan's northern island, were related to northern Asian species, whereas those on Honsh to the south were related to those from southern Asia. The Tsugaru Strait between the two islands was therefore established as a zoogeographical boundary, and became known as "Blakiston's Line". Blakiston collected an owl specimen in Hakodate, Japan in 1883. This was later described by Henry Seebohm and named Blakiston's fish owl. Blakiston married Ann Mary Dun in 1885. She was the daughter of James Dun and the sister of Edwin Dun. They had one daughter and one son. Ann Mary survived him by 46 years and died in England in March 1937. ------ 2. Sources of explorer 1 Kennet District Council Website page on Broad Hinton and Winterbourne Bassett Parish, retrieved 15:40 October 5, 2004 (UTC). Office for National Statistics (ONS) - List of English parishes, retrieved 14:00 October 3, 2004 (UTC). Map 'Explorer 157', published by the Ordnance Survey, .mw-parser-output cite.citationfont-style:inherit.mw-parser-output .citation qquotes:"""""""'""'".mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registrationcolor:#555.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration spanborder-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg")right 0.1em center/12px no-repeat.mw-parser-output code.cs1-codecolor:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-errordisplay:none;font-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-errorfont-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-maintdisplay:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-formatfont-size:95%.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-leftpadding-left:0.2em.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-rightpadding-right:0.2em.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflinkfont-weight:inheritISBN 0-319-21782-5, revised 1997 ------ 3. Professional wrestling career of explorer 1 Joint promotions (19821985)Hindley was trained by his uncle Ted Betley, initially in Winwick Warrington, and then Port Erin, Isle of Man. He made his debut in January 1982 at the age of 16 at Gloucester Leisure Centre, under the name John Savage. He wrestled in the United Kingdom for two years, having regular TV bouts with Alan Kilby and Drew McDonald before moving over to Canada with his wife Jane. Stampede Wrestling (19851989)Joining Stampede Wrestling in 1985, Hindley was billed as Davey Boy Smith's brother, Johnny Smith. He was there involved in a storyline in 1988 where they had a heated rivalry, eventually his storyline sister and brother-in-law Diana Hart and Owen Hart also got involved after Johnny disrespected the Hart family. In February 1989, he began feuding with Dynamite Kid after interfering during a British Bulldogs-Karachi Vice rematch, attacking him from behind and cutting his hair. In May, Dynamite had turned on Davey Boy Smith, and Johnny began teaming with Dynamite as The British Bruisers, feuding with Davey Boy and Chris Benoit. New Japan, All Japan, and Indies (19872003)In 1987, he went on his first Japanese tour in New Japan Pro Wrestling (NJPW). In February 1989, he followed The Dynamite Kid to wrestle for All Japan Pro Wrestling (AJPW) and replaced Davey Boy Smith as Dynamite Kid's tag team partner in September 1990, reforming the tag team: The British Bruisers. In between tours in All Japan, Hindley would wrestle the independent circuit in the United States and Canada, as well as brief stints in Extreme Championship Wrestling. On 10 April 2003, Hindley collapsed prior to his match at an All Japan Pro Wrestling show. Paramedics were called to the Hiroshima Arena and Hindley was rushed to a local hospital, having lost feeling in some parts of his body, but was in stable condition at a local Japanese hospital. Some believe this incident to be connected to a previous injury. Sometime after the incident, Hindley retired. He was planning to make a comeback in March 2004 for IWA Japan, but chose to remain retired due to health reasons. ------ 4. William Moor of explorer 1 William Moor (died 1765) was a British sailor and explorer associated with the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) and the annual supply ships to the bay area. Moor was involved, under the supervision of his cousin, Christopher Middleton, with voyages to the bay from about 1730 to 1741 and carried out increasingly important duties during that period. In 1741 he and Middleton left the HBC's employ and Moor was given command of HMS Discovery to aid his cousin in HMS Furnace in a search for the Northwest Passage. They overwintered at Prince of Wales Fort where sickness plagued the crews. Their survey of the shoreline and tides of the west side of Hudson Bay was not particularly successful. Moor and Middleton and the 17411742 expedition were under the scrutiny of Arthur Dobbs, an opponent of the HBC monopoly of the bay area. Middleton was accused of protecting the HBC monopoly and Moor took the side of Dobbs. In 1746, Moor was in command of a private discovery expedition to Hudson Bay funded by Dobbs and others. After a short and unsuccessful period of exploration by the two ships, they decided to overwinter at the HBC post at York Factory. The next summer some good exploration was carried out on the western shore and discovered Chesterfield Inlet but did not fully explore it. He also examined Rankin Inlet and Wager Bay. At a point, after further exploration, illness and threats of mutiny turned the expedition for home. Moor's competence as a commander was called into question on his return. There is little doubt that his weakness and uncertainty affected the expedition but the unhappiness of the investors was also because he refused to engage in illegal trade on their behalf. Moor appears to have retired around this time. His explorations did add significantly to the knowledge of the area despite his problems with the command of the expedition. ------ 5. Bibliography of explorer 1 Wade, F. Alton (1945). "An Introduction to the Symposium on Scientific Results of the United States Antarctic Service Expedition, 1939-1941". Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society. 89 (1): 13. ISSN 0003-049X.mw-parser-output cite.citationfont-style:inherit.mw-parser-output .citation qquotes:"""""""'""'".mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registrationcolor:#555.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration spanborder-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg")right 0.1em center/12px no-repeat.mw-parser-output code.cs1-codecolor:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-errordisplay:none;font-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-errorfont-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-maintdisplay:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-formatfont-size:95%.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-leftpadding-left:0.2em.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-rightpadding-right:0.2em.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflinkfont-weight:inherit Wade, Franklin Alton; Mattox, Richard Benjamin (1960). Elements of Crystallography and Mineralogy. Harper. p. 332. ------ 6. Ancestry and descendency of explorer 1 His parents were Gonalo Esteves Zarco and wife Brites de Santarm (daughter of Joo Afonso de Santarm (himself the son of Afonso Guilherme de Santarm, the son of Guilherme de Santarm, son of another Afonso Guilherme de Santarm) and wife Filipa Lopes de Couros, male line ancestors of Frei Lus de Sousa). His father was the son of Estvo Pires Zarco, son of Pedro Esteves Zarco, son of Estvo Gonalves Zarco, son of Gonalo . Zarco. He married Constana Rodrigues, daughter of Rodrigo Lopes de Sequeiros (?) and wife, and had: Joo Gonalves da Cmara (d. Funchal, Madeira, 26 March 1501), married to Dona Mcia de Noronha, daughter of Dom Joo Henriques de Noronha (bastard son of Alfonso, Count of Gijn and Noroa) and wife Beatriz, Lady de Mirabel and sister of Dom Garcia Henriques, and had issue, and also one bastard son by an unknown mother Rui Gonalves da Cmara, 3rd Donatary Captain of So Miguel Island, married to Maria de Bettencourt, natural daughter of Maciot de Bettencourt by Teguise, without issue, he had a bastard son by one Maria Rodrigues and three more children by an unknown mother Garcia Rodrigues da Cmara, married to Violante de Freitas, and had issue Beatriz Gonalves da Cmara, married to Diogo Cabral, and had issue Isabel Gonalves da Cmara, married to Diogo Afonso de Aguiar, o Velho (the Old), and had issue Helena Gonalves da Cmara, married to Martim Mendes de Vasconcelos, and had issue Catarina Gonalves da Cmara, married to Garcia Homem de Sousa
Knowledge About Explorer 1
1. Bibliography of explorer 1 Wade, F. Alton (1945). "An Introduction to the Symposium on Scientific Results of the United States Antarctic Service Expedition, 1939-1941". Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society. 89 (1): 13. ISSN 0003-049X.mw-parser-output cite.citationfont-style:inherit.mw-parser-output .citation qquotes:"""""""'""'".mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registrationcolor:#555.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration spanborder-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg")right 0.1em center/12px no-repeat.mw-parser-output code.cs1-codecolor:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-errordisplay:none;font-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-errorfont-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-maintdisplay:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-formatfont-size:95%.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-leftpadding-left:0.2em.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-rightpadding-right:0.2em.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflinkfont-weight:inherit Wade, Franklin Alton; Mattox, Richard Benjamin (1960). Elements of Crystallography and Mineralogy. Harper. p. 332. ------ 2. Lopoldville station head (18811886) of explorer 1 Swinburne became one of Stanley's most trusted companions. Stanley established a trading post on the shore of Ngaliema Bay in 1881, and named it Lopoldville in honor of King Leopold II who was Stanley's patron in the International Association of the Congo and later King-Sovereign of the Congo Free State. Stanley delegated the settlement (today called Kinshasha) to Swinburne. Swinburne also established a small station at Nshasha in 1883 at Stanley's request.a Swinburne developed Lopoldville into an important trading station. Swinburne was friendly with the local people of the Congo, learned to speak the local language and lived with a local woman who gave him a child whom he adored. Stanley assigned a Congolese "boy" to Swinburne named Disasi Makulo, a former slave he had bought from Tippu Tip. He found that Swinburne was a good person to work for, and conditions in the Kinshasa station were comfortable and interesting. Swinburne was both brave and tactful. He managed to stop the French explorer Pierre Savorgnan de Brazza from taking over Lopoldville and forcibly establishing French control of the territory south of the Congo River. King Leopold II of Belgium refused to recognize the great value of Swinburne's work to the Belgian cause, and censored Stanley's book about the Congo Free State to remove its praise of Swinburne. He felt that the French might respond with anger to the story of Swinburne's confrontation with Brazza and decide to seize Lopoldville. ------ 3. Sources of explorer 1 Kennet District Council Website page on Broad Hinton and Winterbourne Bassett Parish, retrieved 15:40 October 5, 2004 (UTC). Office for National Statistics (ONS) - List of English parishes, retrieved 14:00 October 3, 2004 (UTC). Map 'Explorer 157', published by the Ordnance Survey, .mw-parser-output cite.citationfont-style:inherit.mw-parser-output .citation qquotes:"""""""'""'".mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registrationcolor:#555.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration spanborder-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg")right 0.1em center/12px no-repeat.mw-parser-output code.cs1-codecolor:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-errordisplay:none;font-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-errorfont-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-maintdisplay:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-formatfont-size:95%.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-leftpadding-left:0.2em.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-rightpadding-right:0.2em.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflinkfont-weight:inheritISBN 0-319-21782-5, revised 1997 ------ 4. Thurne of explorer 1 Thurne is a small village and civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. It is located on the River Thurne in The Broads, some 18 km (11 mi) west of the town of Great Yarmouth and 20 km (12 mi) east of the city of Norwich. The civil parish has an area of 2.69 km2 (1.04 sq mi) and in the 2001 census had a population of 116 in 54 households, and at the 2011 Census including Ashby with Oby in 94 households had a population of 212. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of Great Yarmouth. The village lies at the end of Thurne Dyke, a popular mooring, not least because of Thurne windpump, which became known locally as Morse's Mill, after the late Bob Morse, who purchased it to prevent it from being sold for scrap. Painted white it is a popular object for photography. There is a second windpump across the river, the St Benet's Level windpump. Thurne is also home to the well-respected sailing club Theta, which has been accommodated here for over half a century and is now part of the village's character. Free moorings are available for three boats at Thurne mouth. From there it is a short walk to the village, with a large pub, the Lion Inn, and a small shop. The Weavers' Way, a long-distance footpath, runs through the village. ------ 5. Hatteras Indians of explorer 1 The Hatteras Indians were a tribe of Native Americans in the United States who were the earliest inhabitants of the North Carolina Outer Banks. They inhabited a village on what is now called Hatteras Island called Croatoan. They lived in a small village consisting of 80 people. The meaning of the name Hatteras is unspecified. It was first used by English explorer John Lawson. Lawson was writing a book where he mentioned the Hatteras Indians for the first time. Although the meaning of Hatteras is unknown, the people from that island were known as the people of shallow water. They are also known as Croatans. They first had contact with English settlers in 1587 and were gone by the mid 18th century. In the 1711 Tuscarora War, the Hatteras Indians sided with the colonists and fought against the Tuscarora tribe and their allies for the colonists. This cost them heavily and many were driven from their lands by enemy tribes. The Hatteras Indians are part of the  Algonquian family. Several people from the Hatters Island are of white ancestry. According to some historians after the tribe was colonized some of them affiliated with other tribes such as the North Carolina Algonquian, Siouan tribes and survivors of the Roanoke colony. The modern-day Roanoke-Hatteras tribe is partially descended from them. It is known that the descendants of the Hatteras Indians are also part of the Lumbee Indians. ------ 6. Thomas Blakiston of explorer 1 Thomas Wright Blakiston (27 December 1832 15 October 1891) was an English explorer and naturalist. Born in Lymington, Hampshire, Blakiston was the son of Major John Blakiston, second son of Sir Matthew Blakiston, 2nd Baronet (see Blakiston baronets for earlier history of the family). His mother was Jane, daughter of Reverend Thomas Wright, Rector of Market Bosworth, Leicestershire. Blakiston explored western Canada with the Palliser Expedition between 1857 and 1859. Mount Blakiston, the highest point in Waterton Lakes National Park was named for him in 1858. In 1861 he traveled up the Yangtze River in China, going further than any Westerner before him. He spent the next part of his life in Japan and became one of the major naturalists in that country. He moved to the United States in 1885. Blakiston died aged 58 of pneumonia in October 1891 while in San Diego, California and is buried in Greenlawn Cemetery, Columbus, Ohio. Blakiston was the first person to notice that animals in Hokkaid, Japan's northern island, were related to northern Asian species, whereas those on Honsh to the south were related to those from southern Asia. The Tsugaru Strait between the two islands was therefore established as a zoogeographical boundary, and became known as "Blakiston's Line". Blakiston collected an owl specimen in Hakodate, Japan in 1883. This was later described by Henry Seebohm and named Blakiston's fish owl. Blakiston married Ann Mary Dun in 1885. She was the daughter of James Dun and the sister of Edwin Dun. They had one daughter and one son. Ann Mary survived him by 46 years and died in England in March 1937. ------ 7. Works of explorer 1 Etienne Aymonier, Antoine Cabaton (1906). Dictionnaire am-franais. Volume 7 of Publications de l'cole franaise d'Extrme-Orient. E. Leroux. Retrieved 2011-05-15.mw-parser-output cite.citationfont-style:inherit.mw-parser-output .citation qquotes:"""""""'""'".mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registrationcolor:#555.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration spanborder-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg")right 0.1em center/12px no-repeat.mw-parser-output code.cs1-codecolor:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-errordisplay:none;font-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-errorfont-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-maintdisplay:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-formatfont-size:95%.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-leftpadding-left:0.2em.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-rightpadding-right:0.2em.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflinkfont-weight:inherit Etienne Aymonier (1889). Grammaire de la langue chame. Imprimerie coloniale. Retrieved 2011-05-15. ------ 8. Early years (18581881) of explorer 1 Anthony Bannister Swinburne was the son of a clergyman who died in 1886. His widow, Frances, was left with very little money, and she struggled to bring up Anthony, living in a series of lodging houses. Stanley first met Swinburne in September 1873. Swinburne was 15 and had just left Christ's Hospital School to work as an apprentice tea broker in the City of London. Stanley, who had never known his father and had a difficult upbringing, developed a paternal feeling to the boy. At the end of 1873 Stanley was sent to West Africa to report on the Third Anglo-Ashanti War. He took the 16-year-old Swinburne with him as a clerk and valet. Stanley met the journalist G. A. Henty in East Africa, and Henty used the hero-worshipping Swinburne as the model for the character Frank Hargate in his 1884 novel By Sheer Pluck. Stanley wrote in his The Congo and the Founding of Its Free State that in March 1880 Swinburne was one of 14 Europeans at Vivi on the lower Congo River other than Stanley. Swinburne, Sparhawk, Kirkbright and Moore were civilian superintendents and agents of stations. The other ten were the officers and sailors of the steamers Belgique, Esprance, En Avant, Royal and Heune Africaine. Sparhawk was the only one to understand any local language.
Knowledge About Explorer 1
1. lvaro Martins of explorer 1 lvaro Martins, also known as lvaro Martins Homem, was a 15th-century Portuguese explorer alleged to have explored the western Atlantic and later the African coast. He is claimed to have accompanied Joo Vaz Corte-Real on an undocumented expedition to Terra Nova do Bacalhau (literally, "New Land of the Codfish") in the early 1470s, by Gaspar Frutuoso in his 1570s book Saudades da Terra. It is known however, that he was granted the captaincy of Praia, in the Portuguese archipelago of the Azores, on 17 February 1474 for his services to Infante Ferdinand, Duke of Viseu, an office he held for some years. It was following the disappearance of Jacome de Bruges that the King divided the island between Angra and Praia, granting Praia to lvaro Martins, while Joo Vaz Corte-Real obtained the Captaincy of Angra. lvaro Martins and his son (Anto) were responsible for the fortifications, and the development of agriculture and commerce in northern Terceira. He is also said to have accompanied Bartolomeu Dias on his journey around the Cape of Good Hope from 1487 to 1488. ------ 2. Early years (18581881) of explorer 1 Anthony Bannister Swinburne was the son of a clergyman who died in 1886. His widow, Frances, was left with very little money, and she struggled to bring up Anthony, living in a series of lodging houses. Stanley first met Swinburne in September 1873. Swinburne was 15 and had just left Christ's Hospital School to work as an apprentice tea broker in the City of London. Stanley, who had never known his father and had a difficult upbringing, developed a paternal feeling to the boy. At the end of 1873 Stanley was sent to West Africa to report on the Third Anglo-Ashanti War. He took the 16-year-old Swinburne with him as a clerk and valet. Stanley met the journalist G. A. Henty in East Africa, and Henty used the hero-worshipping Swinburne as the model for the character Frank Hargate in his 1884 novel By Sheer Pluck. Stanley wrote in his The Congo and the Founding of Its Free State that in March 1880 Swinburne was one of 14 Europeans at Vivi on the lower Congo River other than Stanley. Swinburne, Sparhawk, Kirkbright and Moore were civilian superintendents and agents of stations. The other ten were the officers and sailors of the steamers Belgique, Esprance, En Avant, Royal and Heune Africaine. Sparhawk was the only one to understand any local language. ------ 3. Hatteras Indians of explorer 1 The Hatteras Indians were a tribe of Native Americans in the United States who were the earliest inhabitants of the North Carolina Outer Banks. They inhabited a village on what is now called Hatteras Island called Croatoan. They lived in a small village consisting of 80 people. The meaning of the name Hatteras is unspecified. It was first used by English explorer John Lawson. Lawson was writing a book where he mentioned the Hatteras Indians for the first time. Although the meaning of Hatteras is unknown, the people from that island were known as the people of shallow water. They are also known as Croatans. They first had contact with English settlers in 1587 and were gone by the mid 18th century. In the 1711 Tuscarora War, the Hatteras Indians sided with the colonists and fought against the Tuscarora tribe and their allies for the colonists. This cost them heavily and many were driven from their lands by enemy tribes. The Hatteras Indians are part of the  Algonquian family. Several people from the Hatters Island are of white ancestry. According to some historians after the tribe was colonized some of them affiliated with other tribes such as the North Carolina Algonquian, Siouan tribes and survivors of the Roanoke colony. The modern-day Roanoke-Hatteras tribe is partially descended from them. It is known that the descendants of the Hatteras Indians are also part of the Lumbee Indians. ------ 4. Taddington Moor of explorer 1 Taddington Moor is a limestone hill between the villages of Taddington, Flagg and Chelmorton in the Derbyshire Peak District. The moor is an upland farming landscape. The summit at Sough Top is 438 metres (1,437 ft) above sea level. Five Wells is a Neolithic chambered tomb on Taddington Moor and it is a protected scheduled ancient monument. It was first excavated by the local archeaologist Thomas Bateman in 1846. He discovered the remains of at least twelve human skeletons in the stone-paved chambers. Taddington High Mere (on the edge of the moor south of Taddington village) is an ancient pond, formed during the Ice Age. It is a scarce water source on the White Peak limestone plateau. It was recorded in 1690 by John Orme as 'the great pond or meare called Taddington high Meare'. The ancient packhorse track Oriss Road passed the mere. In 2004 the mere was restored by volunteers from Taddington village with funding from the Countryside Agency. The Pennine Bridleway and the Midshires Way trails follow the same route north-south across the moor to the east of Chelmorten and Calton Hill. The Limestone Way long-distance footpath also runs north-south across the moor between Flagg and The Waterloo pub on the A6 road. ------ 5. Thurne of explorer 1 Thurne is a small village and civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. It is located on the River Thurne in The Broads, some 18 km (11 mi) west of the town of Great Yarmouth and 20 km (12 mi) east of the city of Norwich. The civil parish has an area of 2.69 km2 (1.04 sq mi) and in the 2001 census had a population of 116 in 54 households, and at the 2011 Census including Ashby with Oby in 94 households had a population of 212. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of Great Yarmouth. The village lies at the end of Thurne Dyke, a popular mooring, not least because of Thurne windpump, which became known locally as Morse's Mill, after the late Bob Morse, who purchased it to prevent it from being sold for scrap. Painted white it is a popular object for photography. There is a second windpump across the river, the St Benet's Level windpump. Thurne is also home to the well-respected sailing club Theta, which has been accommodated here for over half a century and is now part of the village's character. Free moorings are available for three boats at Thurne mouth. From there it is a short walk to the village, with a large pub, the Lion Inn, and a small shop. The Weavers' Way, a long-distance footpath, runs through the village. ------ 6. Works of explorer 1 Etienne Aymonier, Antoine Cabaton (1906). Dictionnaire am-franais. Volume 7 of Publications de l'cole franaise d'Extrme-Orient. E. Leroux. Retrieved 2011-05-15.mw-parser-output cite.citationfont-style:inherit.mw-parser-output .citation qquotes:"""""""'""'".mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registrationcolor:#555.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration spanborder-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg")right 0.1em center/12px no-repeat.mw-parser-output code.cs1-codecolor:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-errordisplay:none;font-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-errorfont-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-maintdisplay:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-formatfont-size:95%.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-leftpadding-left:0.2em.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-rightpadding-right:0.2em.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflinkfont-weight:inherit Etienne Aymonier (1889). Grammaire de la langue chame. Imprimerie coloniale. Retrieved 2011-05-15. ------ 7. Wessenden Reservoir of explorer 1 Wessenden Reservoir is the second in a series of four reservoirs in the Wessenden Valley above the village of Marsden in West Yorkshire, at the northern end of the Peak District National Park. Following the Wessenden Act of Parliament of 1836, the Wessenden Commissioners were established to build Wessenden Reservoir, to supply water to power the mills further down the valley and to protect people and property from floods. The reservoir was created by the construction of an earth embankment across Wessenden Brook. The reservoir ran dry during droughts in 1852, 1864 and 1865. The Huddersfield Waterworks Act of 1890 led to Huddersfield Corporation purchasing the reservoir from the Wessenden Commissioners in order to supply drinking water to the town. Wessenden Reservoir has a storage capacity of 107,000,000 imperial gallons (490,000,000 l). The reservoir is currently owned and operated by Yorkshire Water. The Wessenden Valley Woodland Project was initiated in 2017 to develop natural habitats with increased biodiversity. The Pennine Way long-distance footpath runs along the northern side of the reservoir and its dam. The Peak District Boundary Walk long-distance trail also passes the northern end of the dam. ------ 8. Location of explorer 1 The village is in the northernmost part of the Borough of Rugby, it is however more than 10.7 miles (17.2 km) north-west of the town of Rugby and is much closer to the town of Nuneaton which is located 3.2 miles (5.1 km) to the east, and is 8.3 miles (13.4 km) north east of the city of Coventry. The nearest railway station is at Nuneaton. The northern parish boundary is a little south of the A5 trunk road known as Watling Street which is also the county boundary at this point between Warwickshire and Leicestershire. The northern boundary is marked by the Soar Brook which divides it from nearby Stretton Baskerville. The boundary to west and south is with Nuneaton, Bulkington, and Wolvey and the River Anker. The eastern boundary follows the road from Wolvey to Hinckley. A branch of the Coventry Canal system, known as the Ashby de la Zouch Canal passes through the west of the parish. The name derives from the Hastings family who held the manor until 1529. Burton Hastings is often used by commuters who work in nearby towns ------ 9. Hal Lister of explorer 1 Hal Lister (1 May 1921  24 February 2010) was a British geographer and Arctic explorer. Hal was born Harold Lister in Keighley, West Yorkshire, and was educated at Keighley Grammar School and King's College (which later became Newcastle University). In 1948, Hal guided a small group of Newcastle University Geography undergraduates on a pioneering overseas expedition to Iceland. Hal joined the Merchant Navy, but transferred to the Royal Navy after learning to fly. He went to Fitzwilliam College, University of Cambridge in 1950 to do research in the Department of Geography, interrupted by his participation as a glaciologist in the British North Greenland Expedition, 19521954. His Ph.D. was awarded in 1956. Hal was a glaciologist during the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition, 1955-1958. During this expedition led by Sir Vivian Fuchs he helped to develop maps of the Weddell Sea. Hal's last post was as a reader at the School of Geography, Newcastle University. Hal formerly retired in 1986, but continued to travel widely and meet in academic circles until the last few years before he died on 24 February 2010. One of his later interests was Amnesty International.
Introduction to Explorer 1
1. Amaleki (Book of Mormon explorer) of explorer 1 According to the Book of Mormon, Amaleki (/mlka/) was a Nephite explorer who lived in the Americas in the 2nd century BC. He is mentioned briefly as one of the brothers of Ammon, and one of sixteen men that were part of Ammon's band. Under the direction of king Mosiah, the band embarked upon a quest from the land of Zarahemla to find the group of Nephites that had left years before to settle in the land of Nephi (which was predominantly populated by Lamanites at the time). Their exploration party wandered in the wilderness for 40 days before finally stumbling upon the people of Zeniff, who mistook them for Lamanite spies and threw them in prison. Ammon's band was eventually released and helped the people of Zeniff escape the occupation of the Lamanites and return to Zarahemla ------ 2. Taddington Moor of explorer 1 Taddington Moor is a limestone hill between the villages of Taddington, Flagg and Chelmorton in the Derbyshire Peak District. The moor is an upland farming landscape. The summit at Sough Top is 438 metres (1,437 ft) above sea level. Five Wells is a Neolithic chambered tomb on Taddington Moor and it is a protected scheduled ancient monument. It was first excavated by the local archeaologist Thomas Bateman in 1846. He discovered the remains of at least twelve human skeletons in the stone-paved chambers. Taddington High Mere (on the edge of the moor south of Taddington village) is an ancient pond, formed during the Ice Age. It is a scarce water source on the White Peak limestone plateau. It was recorded in 1690 by John Orme as 'the great pond or meare called Taddington high Meare'. The ancient packhorse track Oriss Road passed the mere. In 2004 the mere was restored by volunteers from Taddington village with funding from the Countryside Agency. The Pennine Bridleway and the Midshires Way trails follow the same route north-south across the moor to the east of Chelmorten and Calton Hill. The Limestone Way long-distance footpath also runs north-south across the moor between Flagg and The Waterloo pub on the A6 road. ------ 3. Course of explorer 1 The brook rises to the south of Daccombe, near Coffinswell, and initially flows due west, until it reaches the village of Kingskerswell, where it turns north to flow through the Aller vale. It is joined by a stream on the left which drains Abbotskerswell and Compton. The brook continues north, passing to the west of Milber, before it reaches Newton Abbot. Originally the brook took a meandering course through this marshy area, but in the 1980s it was forced to run alongside the A380 road in a straight channel. The area is now a local nature reserve, situated between the town and the Buckland estate. At the end of the reserve the brook enters the Teign Estuary at the Templer Way footbridge. The water level of the stream has been measured in Kingskerswell since 2004, normal levels are between 0.29 metres (11 in) and 0.42 metres (1 ft 5 in). The maximum recorded level was 1.42 metres (4 ft 8 in) in November 2012. ------ 4. Lyons River of explorer 1 The Lyons River is a river in the Gascoyne region of Western Australia. The headwaters of the Lyons rise just west of the Teano Range and the river flows generally south-west, joined by 36 tributaries including the Edmund River, Frederick River, Onslow Creek, Gifford Creek, Koorabooka Creek and Ulura Creek. The Lyons reaches its confluence with the Gascoyne River near the township of Gascoyne Junction near the southern end of the Kennedy Range. The river descends 398 metres (1,306 ft) over its 561-kilometre (349 mi) course. Several permanent pools of water exist along the river including Cattle Pool, Windarrie Pool and Bubbawonnara Pool. The Lyons River is known as Mithering by the local Indigenous Australians, the Malgaru. The first European to come upon the river was explorer Francis Gregory in 1858, he named the river after the naval hero Admiral Sir Edmund Lyons. ------ 5. Hal Lister of explorer 1 Hal Lister (1 May 1921  24 February 2010) was a British geographer and Arctic explorer. Hal was born Harold Lister in Keighley, West Yorkshire, and was educated at Keighley Grammar School and King's College (which later became Newcastle University). In 1948, Hal guided a small group of Newcastle University Geography undergraduates on a pioneering overseas expedition to Iceland. Hal joined the Merchant Navy, but transferred to the Royal Navy after learning to fly. He went to Fitzwilliam College, University of Cambridge in 1950 to do research in the Department of Geography, interrupted by his participation as a glaciologist in the British North Greenland Expedition, 19521954. His Ph.D. was awarded in 1956. Hal was a glaciologist during the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition, 1955-1958. During this expedition led by Sir Vivian Fuchs he helped to develop maps of the Weddell Sea. Hal's last post was as a reader at the School of Geography, Newcastle University. Hal formerly retired in 1986, but continued to travel widely and meet in academic circles until the last few years before he died on 24 February 2010. One of his later interests was Amnesty International. ------ 6. Newton Morrell of explorer 1 Newton Morrell is a village and civil parish in the Richmondshire district of North Yorkshire, England. It is 6 miles (9 km) from Darlington and 2 miles (3 km) from Junction 56 on the A1(M) motorway and 7 miles (11 km) north-east of Richmond. The village was described in the Domesday Book as belong to Count Alan and in the manor of Gilling. The name of the village derives from a combination of Old English (nwe tn) and a family surname of Morrell (from Old French meaning "dark and husky"). At the 2011 Census the population of the civil parish was less than 100. Information regarding this population is included in the parish of Cleasby. The village is very near Barton and Stapleton. Just to the south of the village is what has been designated as a medieval shrunken village. Earthworks are also present at this site. ------ 7. Missouri of explorer 1 In 1804, McNair traveled to what is now Missouri, the United States having just acquired it following the Louisiana Purchase. In that year, he married Marguerite Suzanne de Reihle de Regal, the daughter of a French marquis. He lived in St. Louis, Missouri, participated in Freemasonry as a member of St. Louis Lodge 111, and served as a United States Marshal. He also became a successful businessman, and served two terms on the Board of Trustees of the Town of St. Louis, in 1808 and 1813. On May 24, 1813, Stephen F. Austin, who was later responsible for the colonization of Texas, and for whom Austin, Texas is named, was commissioned an ensign in the Missouri militia. Later in September, he enlisted as a private in the First Regiment of Mounted Militia commanded by Colonel Alexander McNair. McNair was elected governor in 1820, receiving 72% of the vote and defeating the famous explorer William Clark. After his time as governor, he worked in the Indian Department until his death. ------ 8. Location of explorer 1 The village is in the northernmost part of the Borough of Rugby, it is however more than 10.7 miles (17.2 km) north-west of the town of Rugby and is much closer to the town of Nuneaton which is located 3.2 miles (5.1 km) to the east, and is 8.3 miles (13.4 km) north east of the city of Coventry. The nearest railway station is at Nuneaton. The northern parish boundary is a little south of the A5 trunk road known as Watling Street which is also the county boundary at this point between Warwickshire and Leicestershire. The northern boundary is marked by the Soar Brook which divides it from nearby Stretton Baskerville. The boundary to west and south is with Nuneaton, Bulkington, and Wolvey and the River Anker. The eastern boundary follows the road from Wolvey to Hinckley. A branch of the Coventry Canal system, known as the Ashby de la Zouch Canal passes through the west of the parish. The name derives from the Hastings family who held the manor until 1529. Burton Hastings is often used by commuters who work in nearby towns ------ 9. lvaro Martins of explorer 1 lvaro Martins, also known as lvaro Martins Homem, was a 15th-century Portuguese explorer alleged to have explored the western Atlantic and later the African coast. He is claimed to have accompanied Joo Vaz Corte-Real on an undocumented expedition to Terra Nova do Bacalhau (literally, "New Land of the Codfish") in the early 1470s, by Gaspar Frutuoso in his 1570s book Saudades da Terra. It is known however, that he was granted the captaincy of Praia, in the Portuguese archipelago of the Azores, on 17 February 1474 for his services to Infante Ferdinand, Duke of Viseu, an office he held for some years. It was following the disappearance of Jacome de Bruges that the King divided the island between Angra and Praia, granting Praia to lvaro Martins, while Joo Vaz Corte-Real obtained the Captaincy of Angra. lvaro Martins and his son (Anto) were responsible for the fortifications, and the development of agriculture and commerce in northern Terceira. He is also said to have accompanied Bartolomeu Dias on his journey around the Cape of Good Hope from 1487 to 1488. ------ 10. Early Life of explorer 1 Francis Warner was born in Bishopthorpe, Yorkshire, England, to Reverend Hugh Compton Warner and Nancy Le Plastrier Owen. After serving as vicar of Bishopthorpe from 1932-1938, Rev Warner became vicar of St Martin of Tours in Epsom in 1938, an incumbency he held until his resignation in 1950 to become education secretary of the Church of England Moral Welfare Council. Rev Warner and his family lived in The Old Vicarage, Epsom, throughout World War II, an experience recalled later by Francis in the collection Beauty for Ashes: Selected Prose and Related Documents and the text of David Goodes Blitz Requiem. The elder Warner, who had become an honorary canon of Guildford Cathedral in 1948, died in London, age 51, after a long illness, on 1 July 1956. Francis was educated at Christs Hospital, London College of Music, and St Catharine's College, Cambridge. Whilst at Cambridge, Warner was C.S. Lewis's last graduate student. ------ 11. Wessenden Reservoir of explorer 1 Wessenden Reservoir is the second in a series of four reservoirs in the Wessenden Valley above the village of Marsden in West Yorkshire, at the northern end of the Peak District National Park. Following the Wessenden Act of Parliament of 1836, the Wessenden Commissioners were established to build Wessenden Reservoir, to supply water to power the mills further down the valley and to protect people and property from floods. The reservoir was created by the construction of an earth embankment across Wessenden Brook. The reservoir ran dry during droughts in 1852, 1864 and 1865. The Huddersfield Waterworks Act of 1890 led to Huddersfield Corporation purchasing the reservoir from the Wessenden Commissioners in order to supply drinking water to the town. Wessenden Reservoir has a storage capacity of 107,000,000 imperial gallons (490,000,000 l). The reservoir is currently owned and operated by Yorkshire Water. The Wessenden Valley Woodland Project was initiated in 2017 to develop natural habitats with increased biodiversity. The Pennine Way long-distance footpath runs along the northern side of the reservoir and its dam. The Peak District Boundary Walk long-distance trail also passes the northern end of the dam.
Knowledge About Explorer 1
1. Early Life of explorer 1 Francis Warner was born in Bishopthorpe, Yorkshire, England, to Reverend Hugh Compton Warner and Nancy Le Plastrier Owen. After serving as vicar of Bishopthorpe from 1932-1938, Rev Warner became vicar of St Martin of Tours in Epsom in 1938, an incumbency he held until his resignation in 1950 to become education secretary of the Church of England Moral Welfare Council. Rev Warner and his family lived in The Old Vicarage, Epsom, throughout World War II, an experience recalled later by Francis in the collection Beauty for Ashes: Selected Prose and Related Documents and the text of David Goodes Blitz Requiem. The elder Warner, who had become an honorary canon of Guildford Cathedral in 1948, died in London, age 51, after a long illness, on 1 July 1956. Francis was educated at Christs Hospital, London College of Music, and St Catharine's College, Cambridge. Whilst at Cambridge, Warner was C.S. Lewis's last graduate student. ------ 2. Kirkham, North Yorkshire of explorer 1 Kirkham is a village in North Yorkshire, England, close to Malton, situated in the Howardian Hills alongside the River Derwent, and is notable for the nearby ruins of Kirkham Priory, an Augustinian establishment. Kirkham was historically an extra parochial area in the East Riding of Yorkshire. It became a civil parish in 1866. In 1935 the civil parish was abolished and merged into the civil parish of Firby. In 1974 it was transferred to the new county of North Yorkshire, and when the parish of Firby was abolished it joined the parish of Westow. Kirkham was served by Kirkham Abbey railway station on the York to Scarborough Line between 1845 and 1930. John Oxley (1785-1828), an explorer of south-east Australia, was born here. ------ 3. Lyons River of explorer 1 The Lyons River is a river in the Gascoyne region of Western Australia. The headwaters of the Lyons rise just west of the Teano Range and the river flows generally south-west, joined by 36 tributaries including the Edmund River, Frederick River, Onslow Creek, Gifford Creek, Koorabooka Creek and Ulura Creek. The Lyons reaches its confluence with the Gascoyne River near the township of Gascoyne Junction near the southern end of the Kennedy Range. The river descends 398 metres (1,306 ft) over its 561-kilometre (349 mi) course. Several permanent pools of water exist along the river including Cattle Pool, Windarrie Pool and Bubbawonnara Pool. The Lyons River is known as Mithering by the local Indigenous Australians, the Malgaru. The first European to come upon the river was explorer Francis Gregory in 1858, he named the river after the naval hero Admiral Sir Edmund Lyons. ------ 4. Ecology of explorer 1 The brook has been classed as having both good ecological and chemical quality under the Water Framework Directive. This is in the upper band in the five-part framework scale, which ranges from high, good, and moderate, through to poor and finally bad. Wildlife including dragonflies, kingfishers and otters have been identified within the nature reserve. There is also a notable cluster of Bee Orchids (Ophrys apifera) within the reserve. The recent construction of the Kingskerswell bypass along the Aller valley, required various environmental measures to be included due to the local wildlife. This included the construction of a specially designed tunnel for otters, which will help them navigate beneath the new carriageway when their normal routes, such as culverts are flooded and inaccessible due to high brook levels. ------ 5. Personal life of explorer 1 Hindley is married to a woman named Jane. Hindley became a police officer for the city of Calgary. ReputationAccording to Dynamite Kid's autobiography, Pure Dynamite, Hindley was an English gentleman and a modest personality, as he was one of the few foreign wrestlers that did not negotiate anything at all, letting Giant Baba pay him what he thought was fair. Hindley was also known to be very kind to his fans. One night, a Japanese fan had made a ring jacket for him and was so nice and generous that Johnny didn't have the heart to point out the mistake on it (the misspelling of his first name, which ended up being "Jhonny") to him and wore the jacket throughout his career. ------ 6. Missouri of explorer 1 In 1804, McNair traveled to what is now Missouri, the United States having just acquired it following the Louisiana Purchase. In that year, he married Marguerite Suzanne de Reihle de Regal, the daughter of a French marquis. He lived in St. Louis, Missouri, participated in Freemasonry as a member of St. Louis Lodge 111, and served as a United States Marshal. He also became a successful businessman, and served two terms on the Board of Trustees of the Town of St. Louis, in 1808 and 1813. On May 24, 1813, Stephen F. Austin, who was later responsible for the colonization of Texas, and for whom Austin, Texas is named, was commissioned an ensign in the Missouri militia. Later in September, he enlisted as a private in the First Regiment of Mounted Militia commanded by Colonel Alexander McNair. McNair was elected governor in 1820, receiving 72% of the vote and defeating the famous explorer William Clark. After his time as governor, he worked in the Indian Department until his death. ------ 7. Jacques Cartier Strait of explorer 1 The Jacques Cartier Strait (French: Dtroit de Jacques-Cartier) is a strait in eastern Quebec, Canada, flowing between Anticosti Island and the Labrador Peninsula. It is one of the two outlets of the Saint Lawrence River into its estuary, the Gulf of Saint Lawrence. The other is the Honguedo Strait on the south side of Anticosti Island. The Jacques Cartier Strait is approximately 35 kilometres (22 mi) wide at its narrowest point. Jacques Cartier Strait was officially named for the French explorer Jacques Cartier in 1934 by the Geographic Board of Quebec to commemorate the 400th anniversary of his arrival in North America. Prior to this, it was also known as Dtroit Saint-Pierre (by Cartier himself on August 1, 1534, the day of St. Peter), Labrador Channel (until 1815), and Mingan Passage. ------ 8. History of explorer 1 The village was recorded in the Domesday Book with around 18 households as part of the holdings of King William. The population varied between around 100 and 150 between 1800 and 1950 before declining in the later 20th century. In 1846 the manor formed part of the land owned by Samuel Morton Peto. Rushmere Hall, which dates to the 16th century, is a Grade II* listed farmhouse. The parish church is a round-tower church which dates to the Norman period and is a Grade I listed building. The church is dedicated to St. Michael and All Angels and is situated to the north of the parish, close to the parish boundary with Mutford. The majority of the building is medieval and the roof is thatched. The building was derelict in the 1930s but was restored by the local community and reopened in 2010. ------ 9. Amaleki (Book of Mormon explorer) of explorer 1 According to the Book of Mormon, Amaleki (/mlka/) was a Nephite explorer who lived in the Americas in the 2nd century BC. He is mentioned briefly as one of the brothers of Ammon, and one of sixteen men that were part of Ammon's band. Under the direction of king Mosiah, the band embarked upon a quest from the land of Zarahemla to find the group of Nephites that had left years before to settle in the land of Nephi (which was predominantly populated by Lamanites at the time). Their exploration party wandered in the wilderness for 40 days before finally stumbling upon the people of Zeniff, who mistook them for Lamanite spies and threw them in prison. Ammon's band was eventually released and helped the people of Zeniff escape the occupation of the Lamanites and return to Zarahemla ------ 10. Course of explorer 1 The brook rises to the south of Daccombe, near Coffinswell, and initially flows due west, until it reaches the village of Kingskerswell, where it turns north to flow through the Aller vale. It is joined by a stream on the left which drains Abbotskerswell and Compton. The brook continues north, passing to the west of Milber, before it reaches Newton Abbot. Originally the brook took a meandering course through this marshy area, but in the 1980s it was forced to run alongside the A380 road in a straight channel. The area is now a local nature reserve, situated between the town and the Buckland estate. At the end of the reserve the brook enters the Teign Estuary at the Templer Way footbridge. The water level of the stream has been measured in Kingskerswell since 2004, normal levels are between 0.29 metres (11 in) and 0.42 metres (1 ft 5 in). The maximum recorded level was 1.42 metres (4 ft 8 in) in November 2012. ------ 11. tienne Aymonier of explorer 1 tienne Franois Aymonier (26 February 1844 21 January 1929) was a French linguist and explorer. He was the first archaeologist to systematically survey the ruins of the Khmer empire in today's Cambodia, Thailand, Laos and southern Vietnam. His principal work was "Le Cambodge", published in three volumes from 1900 to 1904. He was born in Le Chtelard, Savoie, France. He also served as acting French representative for the French protectorate of Cambodia from 6 January 1879 to 10 May 1881 and was the first director of the cole Coloniale. He assembled a large collection of Khmer sculpture which was later housed in the Guimet Museum in Paris. He also wrote books on the Cham language. The species Gyrinocheilus aymonieri (Siamese algae eater) commemorates his name. ------ 12. Thomas Anburey of explorer 1 Thomas Anburey (active late 1700s) was a British explorer and writer who wrote a disputed narrative of his travels in North America in the 1770s-1780s. Arnburey sailed from Cork in 1776 in charge of Irish recruits of the 47th Regiment. He served under General John Burgoyne in the Battle of Saratoga. Taken prisoner in the United States, he was sent back to Britain in 1781. He stayed in the army one more year, then returned to private life. He wrote Travels Through the Interior Parts of America, 1771-1781 which was published in England in 1789. It was published again in London in 1791, described as a New Edition. It was reissued in 2 volumes in 1923. This work has been a subject of controversy and entertainment ever since and there are claims of fraud. ------ 13. Newton Morrell of explorer 1 Newton Morrell is a village and civil parish in the Richmondshire district of North Yorkshire, England. It is 6 miles (9 km) from Darlington and 2 miles (3 km) from Junction 56 on the A1(M) motorway and 7 miles (11 km) north-east of Richmond. The village was described in the Domesday Book as belong to Count Alan and in the manor of Gilling. The name of the village derives from a combination of Old English (nwe tn) and a family surname of Morrell (from Old French meaning "dark and husky"). At the 2011 Census the population of the civil parish was less than 100. Information regarding this population is included in the parish of Cleasby. The village is very near Barton and Stapleton. Just to the south of the village is what has been designated as a medieval shrunken village. Earthworks are also present at this site. ------ 14. University CareerExperimental Theatre in OxfordWriting of explorer 1 Warner produced several volumes of lyrical poetry early in his career and was honoured for his poetry as the recipient of the Messing Award (now known as the St. Louis Literary Award) in 1972 by the St. Louis University Library Associates. Warner began writing plays in the early 1970s, creating a body of theatrical work that would later be styled as the dramatic play cycle Agora. In addition to the plays in Agora, Warner continued writing poetry, publishing several volumes throughout his later literary years. Early PoetryAgoraThe dramatic cycle Agora encompasses the entirely of Warner's literary output as a dramatist. Consisting of 16 individual plays, loosely following a chronological order of action, Agora tracks the development of Western culture from ancient Greece to the present. Musical Settings
Introduction to Explorer 1
1. University CareerExperimental Theatre in OxfordWriting of explorer 1 Warner produced several volumes of lyrical poetry early in his career and was honoured for his poetry as the recipient of the Messing Award (now known as the St. Louis Literary Award) in 1972 by the St. Louis University Library Associates. Warner began writing plays in the early 1970s, creating a body of theatrical work that would later be styled as the dramatic play cycle Agora. In addition to the plays in Agora, Warner continued writing poetry, publishing several volumes throughout his later literary years. Early PoetryAgoraThe dramatic cycle Agora encompasses the entirely of Warner's literary output as a dramatist. Consisting of 16 individual plays, loosely following a chronological order of action, Agora tracks the development of Western culture from ancient Greece to the present. Musical Settings ------ 2. Scholarship of explorer 1 In academic circles Hal was perhaps best known for his glaciology and his exploration story telling. He was an active member of the International Glaciology Society for many years. Hal's enthusiasm for exploration was expressed in his involvement with the Young Explorers Trust, the British Schools Exploring Society, the Royal Geographical Society and the Brathay Exploration Society. The Origin of Ice Marginal Terraces and Contact Ridges of East Kangerdluarssuk Glacier, SW Greenland David Huddart and Hal Lister Geografiska Annaler. Series A, Physical Geography, Vol. 63, No. 1/2 (1981), pp. 3139 Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Swedish Society for Anthropology and Geography Article Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/520562 ------ 3. Ashby with Oby of explorer 1 Ashby with Oby is a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk, which is located some 5 kilometres (3 mi) north of Acle and 15 kilometres (9 mi) north-west of Great Yarmouth. The parish largely comprises scattered farms, and is named for the tiny settlements of Ashby and Oby. The civil parish has an area of 5.72 square kilometres (2 sq mi). In the 2001 census it had a population of 69 in 28 households. At the 2011 Census the population of the parish remained less than 100 and was included in the civil parish of Thurne. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of Great Yarmouth. Wisemans's Mill is a 4-storey brick-built windpump built in 1753 by Robert Martin. ------ 4. tienne Aymonier of explorer 1 tienne Franois Aymonier (26 February 1844 21 January 1929) was a French linguist and explorer. He was the first archaeologist to systematically survey the ruins of the Khmer empire in today's Cambodia, Thailand, Laos and southern Vietnam. His principal work was "Le Cambodge", published in three volumes from 1900 to 1904. He was born in Le Chtelard, Savoie, France. He also served as acting French representative for the French protectorate of Cambodia from 6 January 1879 to 10 May 1881 and was the first director of the cole Coloniale. He assembled a large collection of Khmer sculpture which was later housed in the Guimet Museum in Paris. He also wrote books on the Cham language. The species Gyrinocheilus aymonieri (Siamese algae eater) commemorates his name. ------ 5. Vicente de Santa Maria of explorer 1 Father Vicente de Santa Mara (1742 July 16, 1806) was a Spanish Franciscan priest who accompanied explorer Juan de Ayala on the first Spanish naval entry aboard the San Carlos into the San Francisco Bay. Born in the village of Aras in Navarre Province, Spain, Santa Maria moved to Mexico City to attend the Colegio de San Fernando seminary in 1769. Santa Maria wrote detailed first-hand accounts of the journey of the San Carlos and of the indigenous inhabitants of the San Francisco Bay Area prior to Spanish colonization. He later served at Mission San Francisco de Asis in San Francisco and Mission San Buenaventura in Ventura, California, where he died in 1806 ------ 6. History of explorer 1 The village was recorded in the Domesday Book with around 18 households as part of the holdings of King William. The population varied between around 100 and 150 between 1800 and 1950 before declining in the later 20th century. In 1846 the manor formed part of the land owned by Samuel Morton Peto. Rushmere Hall, which dates to the 16th century, is a Grade II* listed farmhouse. The parish church is a round-tower church which dates to the Norman period and is a Grade I listed building. The church is dedicated to St. Michael and All Angels and is situated to the north of the parish, close to the parish boundary with Mutford. The majority of the building is medieval and the roof is thatched. The building was derelict in the 1930s but was restored by the local community and reopened in 2010. ------ 7. Thorvald Nilsen of explorer 1 Thorvald Nilsen (6 August 1881 19 April 1940 ) was a Norwegian naval officer and polar explorer. He was born in Kristiansand where he attended Kristiansand Cathedral School. He was enrolled in the Maritime War at Karljohansvern in Horten, graduating in 1903. He received his skipper's certificate in 1906. He was captain of the ship Fram for Amundsen's South Pole expedition from 1910 to 1912. During this period the ship was also used for oceanographic observations and measurements in the south Atlantic Ocean. He was decorated Knight, First Class of the Order of St. Olav in 1913. He served as a naval officer in Norway during World War I, and later settled in Buenos Aires, where he died in 1940. ------ 8. Jacques Cartier Strait of explorer 1 The Jacques Cartier Strait (French: Dtroit de Jacques-Cartier) is a strait in eastern Quebec, Canada, flowing between Anticosti Island and the Labrador Peninsula. It is one of the two outlets of the Saint Lawrence River into its estuary, the Gulf of Saint Lawrence. The other is the Honguedo Strait on the south side of Anticosti Island. The Jacques Cartier Strait is approximately 35 kilometres (22 mi) wide at its narrowest point. Jacques Cartier Strait was officially named for the French explorer Jacques Cartier in 1934 by the Geographic Board of Quebec to commemorate the 400th anniversary of his arrival in North America. Prior to this, it was also known as Dtroit Saint-Pierre (by Cartier himself on August 1, 1534, the day of St. Peter), Labrador Channel (until 1815), and Mingan Passage. ------ 9. Pidla of explorer 1 Pidla is a village in Otep Parish, Valga County in southeastern Estonia. It's located about 6 km (4 mi) north of the town of Otep. Pidla has a population of 94 (as of 1 January 2011). Besides the 23.8 ha (59 acres) Lake Mrtsuka, there are several smaller lakes located in the village: Ahvenjrv, Kalmejrv, Kverjrv, Misajrv, Nkijrv and Uibujrv. The landscape around the lakes is hilly. Pidla Manor was first mentioned in 1522 as Krowelshof, later known as Samhof and Paidel. In the 19th century it was owned by explorer Alexander von Middendorff. Nowadays the manor buildings are destroyed, only an alley has survived. ------ 10. Ecology of explorer 1 The brook has been classed as having both good ecological and chemical quality under the Water Framework Directive. This is in the upper band in the five-part framework scale, which ranges from high, good, and moderate, through to poor and finally bad. Wildlife including dragonflies, kingfishers and otters have been identified within the nature reserve. There is also a notable cluster of Bee Orchids (Ophrys apifera) within the reserve. The recent construction of the Kingskerswell bypass along the Aller valley, required various environmental measures to be included due to the local wildlife. This included the construction of a specially designed tunnel for otters, which will help them navigate beneath the new carriageway when their normal routes, such as culverts are flooded and inaccessible due to high brook levels. ------ 11. Henri de Feynes of explorer 1 Henri de Feynes, Comte de Monfart, Monsart or Montfort, was a 17th-century French explorer and adventurer who was the first Frenchman to visit China. He may have been sent on a secret mission by King Henry IV. Henri de Feynes arrived in China in 1609, after three years travelling on land and on the seas. He finally reached the city of Canton. Henri de Feynes published an account of his journey in London in 1615. His book was then published in French in 1630. Long thought to be a charlatan, corroboration having been found from contemporaries Jean Mocquet and Franois Pyrard, his account is now recognised as genuine. ------ 12. Personal life of explorer 1 Hindley is married to a woman named Jane. Hindley became a police officer for the city of Calgary. ReputationAccording to Dynamite Kid's autobiography, Pure Dynamite, Hindley was an English gentleman and a modest personality, as he was one of the few foreign wrestlers that did not negotiate anything at all, letting Giant Baba pay him what he thought was fair. Hindley was also known to be very kind to his fans. One night, a Japanese fan had made a ring jacket for him and was so nice and generous that Johnny didn't have the heart to point out the mistake on it (the misspelling of his first name, which ended up being "Jhonny") to him and wore the jacket throughout his career. ------ 13. Thomas Anburey of explorer 1 Thomas Anburey (active late 1700s) was a British explorer and writer who wrote a disputed narrative of his travels in North America in the 1770s-1780s. Arnburey sailed from Cork in 1776 in charge of Irish recruits of the 47th Regiment. He served under General John Burgoyne in the Battle of Saratoga. Taken prisoner in the United States, he was sent back to Britain in 1781. He stayed in the army one more year, then returned to private life. He wrote Travels Through the Interior Parts of America, 1771-1781 which was published in England in 1789. It was published again in London in 1791, described as a New Edition. It was reissued in 2 volumes in 1923. This work has been a subject of controversy and entertainment ever since and there are claims of fraud. ------ 14. Possible Jewish ancestry of explorer 1 There are discussions as to whether Joo Gonalves Zarco could have been of Jewish Converso origin. Zarco was a prominent Jewish family from Santarm and Lisbon. Moss Zarco was King Joo II's tailor. There was also a Portuguese doctor named Joseph Zarco, whom some authors claim to be Joseph Ibn Sharga, the great kabbalist, and a sixteenth-century poet named Yehuda Zarco. Augusto Mascarenhas Barreto suggested that Christopher Columbus could have been of Jewish descent from Portugal and his real name was Salvador Fernandes Zarco. Isabel Violante Pereira also attributes Jewish ancestry to Joo Gonalves Zarco. ------ 15. Kirkham, North Yorkshire of explorer 1 Kirkham is a village in North Yorkshire, England, close to Malton, situated in the Howardian Hills alongside the River Derwent, and is notable for the nearby ruins of Kirkham Priory, an Augustinian establishment. Kirkham was historically an extra parochial area in the East Riding of Yorkshire. It became a civil parish in 1866. In 1935 the civil parish was abolished and merged into the civil parish of Firby. In 1974 it was transferred to the new county of North Yorkshire, and when the parish of Firby was abolished it joined the parish of Westow. Kirkham was served by Kirkham Abbey railway station on the York to Scarborough Line between 1845 and 1930. John Oxley (1785-1828), an explorer of south-east Australia, was born here. ------ 16. Prilaid of explorer 1 Prilaid (alternately: Priotsa laid) is an islet in the Baltic Sea belonging to the country of Estonia. Prilaid covers approximately 0.0195 hectares, with a perimeter of 1.7 kilometers. The islet has a sinuous coastline and has, through natural process, become connected to the islet of Selglaid. The islet is fully protected since 1976 as part of the Sparrow Islets Landscape reserve (Estonian: Varbla laidude maastikukaitseala), and is an important breeding site for 54 species of birds. Prilaid belongs administratively to Lneranna Parish in Prnu County. A fully operational lighthouse has been in use on the island since its construction in 1939, and is maintained by the Estonian Maritime Administration. ------ 17. Competitor backlinking of explorer 1 Competitor backlinking is a search engine optimization strategy that involves analyzing the backlinks of competing websites within a vertical search. The outcome of this activity is designed to increase organic search engine rankings and to gain an understanding of the link building strategies used by business competitors. By analyzing the backlinks to competitor websites, it is possible to gain a benchmark on the number of links and the quality of links that is required for high search engine rankings. Another possible outcome of competitive backlinking is the identification of the type of websites that are inclined to link to a specific type of website.
Knowledge About Explorer 1
1. Thorvald Nilsen of explorer 1 Thorvald Nilsen (6 August 1881 19 April 1940 ) was a Norwegian naval officer and polar explorer. He was born in Kristiansand where he attended Kristiansand Cathedral School. He was enrolled in the Maritime War at Karljohansvern in Horten, graduating in 1903. He received his skipper's certificate in 1906. He was captain of the ship Fram for Amundsen's South Pole expedition from 1910 to 1912. During this period the ship was also used for oceanographic observations and measurements in the south Atlantic Ocean. He was decorated Knight, First Class of the Order of St. Olav in 1913. He served as a naval officer in Norway during World War I, and later settled in Buenos Aires, where he died in 1940. ------ 2. Mukhra Thuthai haphong of explorer 1 Mukhra Thuthai Haphong is a significant border peak of Bangladesh, situated in the southern part of Belaichori of Rangamati Hill District. In April 2013, Fahim Hasan of BD Explorer summitted and measured this peak for the first time. Elevation measured at 953.6 metres (3,129 ft). The name of the peak was collected by BD Explorer and confirmed by the local tribal people of Dhupanichora village. The name Mukhra Thuthai Haphong came from the Tripura language. Nearest settlement is known as Dhupanichora para. The easiest route to summit this peak is to start from Ruma of Bandarban district. ------ 3. Scholarship of explorer 1 In academic circles Hal was perhaps best known for his glaciology and his exploration story telling. He was an active member of the International Glaciology Society for many years. Hal's enthusiasm for exploration was expressed in his involvement with the Young Explorers Trust, the British Schools Exploring Society, the Royal Geographical Society and the Brathay Exploration Society. The Origin of Ice Marginal Terraces and Contact Ridges of East Kangerdluarssuk Glacier, SW Greenland David Huddart and Hal Lister Geografiska Annaler. Series A, Physical Geography, Vol. 63, No. 1/2 (1981), pp. 3139 Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Swedish Society for Anthropology and Geography Article Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/520562 ------ 4. Henri de Feynes of explorer 1 Henri de Feynes, Comte de Monfart, Monsart or Montfort, was a 17th-century French explorer and adventurer who was the first Frenchman to visit China. He may have been sent on a secret mission by King Henry IV. Henri de Feynes arrived in China in 1609, after three years travelling on land and on the seas. He finally reached the city of Canton. Henri de Feynes published an account of his journey in London in 1615. His book was then published in French in 1630. Long thought to be a charlatan, corroboration having been found from contemporaries Jean Mocquet and Franois Pyrard, his account is now recognised as genuine. ------ 5. Francis Warner (author) of explorer 1 Francis Robert Le Plastrier Warner (born 21 October 1937) is an English poet, playwright, musician, and scholar. Warner received early notice for his lyrical poetry but has focused most of his later literary career on Agora, a cycle of plays that explores the development of Western culture up to the late Twentieth Century. An Emeritus Fellow of St. Peter's College, Oxford, and Honorary Fellow of St. Catharine's College, Cambridge, Warner was also a noted advocate for experimental theatre, leading attempts during the 1960s and 1970s to establish a Samuel Beckett Theatre for avant garde theatre production in Oxford. ------ 6. Rushmere, north Suffolk of explorer 1 Rushmere is a village and civil parish in the East Suffolk district of the English county of Suffolk. The village is around 5 miles (8.0 km) south-west of Lowestoft and 5 12 miles (8.9 km) south-east of Beccles. Neighbouring parishes include Carlton Colville, Gisleham, Henstead with Hulver Street, Kessingland and Mutford. The Hundred River forms the southern boundary of the parish. Settlement within the parish is dispersed without a village centre. The population was estimated at 60 in 2016. The majority of the land in the parish is agricultural with the name meaning a rushy enclosure or lake. ------ 7. Competitor backlinking of explorer 1 Competitor backlinking is a search engine optimization strategy that involves analyzing the backlinks of competing websites within a vertical search. The outcome of this activity is designed to increase organic search engine rankings and to gain an understanding of the link building strategies used by business competitors. By analyzing the backlinks to competitor websites, it is possible to gain a benchmark on the number of links and the quality of links that is required for high search engine rankings. Another possible outcome of competitive backlinking is the identification of the type of websites that are inclined to link to a specific type of website. ------ 8. Unga Island of explorer 1 Unga Island (Unaasaqax in Aleut) is the largest of the Shumagin Islands off the Alaska Peninsula in southwestern Alaska, United States. The island has a land area of 170.73 sq mi (442.188 km), making it the 36th largest island in the United States. As of the 2000 census, it had a permanent population of one. Unga Island was formerly named Grekodelarovskoe (Greek Delarov) for Greek explorer Evstratii Ivanovich Delarov Greek: ( ) who explored the area in the late 18th century on behalf of the Russian-American Company. In 1968, Unga Island, was designated as a National Natural Landmark by the National Park Service. ------ 9. Fritton and St Olaves of explorer 1 Fritton and St Olaves is a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The parish comprises the villages of Fritton and St. Olaves, together with the surrounding rural area. The civil parish has an area of 7.63 km2 (2.95 sq mi) and in the 2001 census had a population of 543 in 236 households, the population reducing to 524 at the 2011 census. For the purposes of local government, the parish today falls within the district of Great Yarmouth. However prior to the Local Government Act 1972, the parish was within Lothingland Rural District in Suffolk. ------ 10. Southern Maine Coast of explorer 1 Southern Maine Coast is a region of the U.S. state of Maine. It commonly includes York County and Cumberland County. Some notable towns are Kittery, York, Wells, Ogunquit, Kennebunk, Kennebunkport, Saco, and Scarborough. It contains Portland, Maine, the largest city in the state One of the first parts of Maine to be settled early in the nineteenth century, the region was one of the most prosperous in the United States being a ship building and trading center, and much architecture survives from this era. Today it is the heart of Maine's tourism industry, containing 90% of the state's sandy beaches. ------ 11. Raynolds Pass of explorer 1 Raynolds Pass, elevation 6,844 feet (2,086 m), is a mountain pass on the Montana-Idaho border in the Rocky Mountains, United States. The pass is on the Continental Divide, and is traversed by a state highway (Idaho State Highway 87 and Montana Highway 87). The pass is named for Captain William F. Raynolds, an early explorer and officer-in-charge of the Raynolds Expedition of the Yellowstone region. The pass is very gentle, with only a slight grade and no major hairpin curves to the highways connections with U.S. Route 287 in Montana and U.S. Route 20 in Idaho ------ 12. Prilaid of explorer 1 Prilaid (alternately: Priotsa laid) is an islet in the Baltic Sea belonging to the country of Estonia. Prilaid covers approximately 0.0195 hectares, with a perimeter of 1.7 kilometers. The islet has a sinuous coastline and has, through natural process, become connected to the islet of Selglaid. The islet is fully protected since 1976 as part of the Sparrow Islets Landscape reserve (Estonian: Varbla laidude maastikukaitseala), and is an important breeding site for 54 species of birds. Prilaid belongs administratively to Lneranna Parish in Prnu County. A fully operational lighthouse has been in use on the island since its construction in 1939, and is maintained by the Estonian Maritime Administration. ------ 13. Murder of Diana Garbutt of explorer 1 In March 2010, village postmistress Diana Garbutt was found dead in the living quarters above the shop, after suffering severe head injuries. Her husband Robin Garbutt was charged with her murder. He was committed for trial and pleaded not guilty. On 27 September Robin Garbutt was released on bail due to a significant breakthrough in the case against him. On 19 April 2011, following trial at Teesside Crown Court, he was convicted of the murder of Diane Garbutt and was sentenced to life imprisonment. ------ 14. Possible Jewish ancestry of explorer 1 There are discussions as to whether Joo Gonalves Zarco could have been of Jewish Converso origin. Zarco was a prominent Jewish family from Santarm and Lisbon. Moss Zarco was King Joo II's tailor. There was also a Portuguese doctor named Joseph Zarco, whom some authors claim to be Joseph Ibn Sharga, the great kabbalist, and a sixteenth-century poet named Yehuda Zarco. Augusto Mascarenhas Barreto suggested that Christopher Columbus could have been of Jewish descent from Portugal and his real name was Salvador Fernandes Zarco. Isabel Violante Pereira also attributes Jewish ancestry to Joo Gonalves Zarco. ------ 15. Nasser Rastegar-Nejad of explorer 1 Nasser Rastegar-Nejad (Persian: ; April 24, 1939 December 13, 2018) was an Iranian Santur player. He released an album on the Nonesuch Records Explorer label. In 1968, a section of the track 'Dashti' (1:58 - 3:24), played by Nasser Rastegar-Nejad, and originally to be found on the album Mid East, volume 8, 1968, published by American Friends of the Middle East, was used in the film Performance to accompany the scene in which characters played by Mick Jagger and Anita Pallenberg make love. The track has since been re-released, along with others, on the Lyrichord album In A Persian Garden: The Santur in 2007 ------ 16. Ashby with Oby of explorer 1 Ashby with Oby is a civil parish in the English county of Norfolk, which is located some 5 kilometres (3 mi) north of Acle and 15 kilometres (9 mi) north-west of Great Yarmouth. The parish largely comprises scattered farms, and is named for the tiny settlements of Ashby and Oby. The civil parish has an area of 5.72 square kilometres (2 sq mi). In the 2001 census it had a population of 69 in 28 households. At the 2011 Census the population of the parish remained less than 100 and was included in the civil parish of Thurne. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of Great Yarmouth. Wisemans's Mill is a 4-storey brick-built windpump built in 1753 by Robert Martin. ------ 17. Overview of explorer 1 The village is located on the north-western edge of the North York Moors National Park and is 0.6 miles (1 km) south of the A172 road, and is 3.7 miles (6 km) from the A19 to the west and 3.7 miles (6 km) from Stokesley to the north-east. The name of the village derives from the Old Norse meaning "Feit's Settlement", with Feit being a personal name. It has one pub (The Sutton Arms), a village hall, and a 12th-century church, St Mary Magdalene. Buses run to Northallerton and Stokesley three or four times a day. ------ 18. Pidla of explorer 1 Pidla is a village in Otep Parish, Valga County in southeastern Estonia. It's located about 6 km (4 mi) north of the town of Otep. Pidla has a population of 94 (as of 1 January 2011). Besides the 23.8 ha (59 acres) Lake Mrtsuka, there are several smaller lakes located in the village: Ahvenjrv, Kalmejrv, Kverjrv, Misajrv, Nkijrv and Uibujrv. The landscape around the lakes is hilly. Pidla Manor was first mentioned in 1522 as Krowelshof, later known as Samhof and Paidel. In the 19th century it was owned by explorer Alexander von Middendorff. Nowadays the manor buildings are destroyed, only an alley has survived. ------ 19. Life of explorer 1 Training at the Ecole royale de Marine (17731775), he fought in several campaigns from 1776 to 1783 and held his last command on the la Dorade (decommissioned in 1783). Lieutenant de vaisseau from 14 April 1781, he received the ordre de Saint-Louis on 1 June 1783. On 13 May 1785, the comte d'Hector chose Morel d'Escures, to oversee the works on and arming of the Portefaix (later the Boussole), and would embark on that ship as ensign. He died trying to negotiate the passage of the bay of Lituya. ------ 20. Vicente de Santa Maria of explorer 1 Father Vicente de Santa Mara (1742 July 16, 1806) was a Spanish Franciscan priest who accompanied explorer Juan de Ayala on the first Spanish naval entry aboard the San Carlos into the San Francisco Bay. Born in the village of Aras in Navarre Province, Spain, Santa Maria moved to Mexico City to attend the Colegio de San Fernando seminary in 1769. Santa Maria wrote detailed first-hand accounts of the journey of the San Carlos and of the indigenous inhabitants of the San Francisco Bay Area prior to Spanish colonization. He later served at Mission San Francisco de Asis in San Francisco and Mission San Buenaventura in Ventura, California, where he died in 1806
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