Hot Water Cylinders Explained - How They Work | the Cylinder Guy

In New Zealand the most common form of hot water heating system is the humble hot water cylinder, low installation costs and proven reliability have made a firm favourite across the country for many many years. Although electricity is historically the most popular, these days hot water cylinders can be powered by gas, solar energy, heat pumps and wetback systems or mixed combinations of these methods. Simplicity has always been the key to the success of hot water cylinders, they deliver hot water right where you need it with a minimum of fuss. Similar to an electric jug, hot water cylinders rely on an element encased within an insulated and reinforced storage tank to heat and maintain the surrounding water to the required temperature, which is regulated by the cylinders thermostat. (In New Zealand the recommended hot water temperature is 60 degrees in the cylinder and no more than 55 degrees at the tap). Essentially cold water automatically enters the cylinders storage tank when hot water exits, resulting in a lowering of the water temperature in the bottom of the tank, this then triggers the thermostat which allows the element to activate and heat the water to the set temperature again. This process continues 24/7 keeping you in a constant supply of perfectly heated hot water. What Are The Components Of A Hot Water Cylinder? The Storage Tank. Modern mains pressure hot water storage tanks will usually have a steel inner cylinder which is lined with glass or vitreous enamel, insulation and a steel outer lining. Depending on their age low pressure tanks may have a copper lining. The Thermostat. Essentially a thermometer, the thermostat controls the water temperature inside the storage tank. The thermostat is fully automatic meaning power is only used when heating is required. The Element. One and in some cases two immersion elements are located inside the storage tank, it creates the heat needed to heat the water. Some tanks will have two heating elements, each controlled by its own thermostat, only turning on when the water goes beneath the pre-set temperature. The Temperature Pressure Relief Valve. This is there to protect the hot water cylinder from excess pressures and temperatures and hopefully avoid major damage to the cylinder and/or your house! The Anode Rod. Wherever there is water there is going to be corrosion. In order to prolong the lifespan of the storage tank and reduce corrosion over time an anode rod is suspended within the tank to act as a sacrificial piece of metal. The Anode Rod is usually made of magnesium or aluminium with a steel core. The Drain Valve. Used to drain the hot water cylinder of its water in order to make repairs, move or replace etc. What Are The Benefits Of Electric Powered Hot Water Cylinders? Energy Efficiency. It may surprise many people to learn that electric hot water cylinders are actually more energy efficient than gas water heaters. Conventional electric hot water cylinders average about a 90% efficiency rating, while a conventional gas water heater averages about 60%. Easy Shutdown. Turning off the hot water cylinder while you are away is easy, just flip the switch on the wall. Great for saving power when away on holiday. Large Storage Capacity. There is always plenty of water on hand. Low Upfront Costs. The upfront costs of electric hot water cylinders will come in well under other forms of water heating here in New Zealand. Tried And Tested Reliability. Electric hot water cylinders have been around for many many years, the components have been refined and perfected providing excellent reliability and extended life expectancy. Good Flexibility. Hot water cylinders are available for purchase with future proofing in mind. They can be solar ready, wetback ready, or suited to hot water heat pumps. Allowing for greater adaptation if/when you circumstances change or hot water demands alter. Mains pressure and low pressure options are also available. External Installation. Certain types of hot water cylinders are now able to be installed outside the house, freeing up space within the home and providing easier access when servicing is needed. What Are The Drawbacks For Electric Powered Hot Water Cylinders? Slow Recovery Rates. The speed at which your hot water cylinder heats its water to temperature in an hour is referred to as its recovery rate. Electric hot water cylinders tend to have slower recovery rates than gas hot water heaters. Electricity costs. It is thought hot water heating amounts to roughly a third of a household's electricity bill. High electricity costs in New Zealand are a definite motivator for some people to look for water heating alternatives. Need help deciding which hot water cylinder is right for you? Talk with the experts in Hot Water Cylinder repairs and replacements at The Cylinder Guy. Whether it is mains pressure hot water cylinders, low pressure hot water cylinders, gas hot water heating, an outdoor cylinder, solar or wetback powered hot water cylinders or the increasingly popular hot water heat pump system, the nationwide network of installers at The Cylinder Guy will provide you with the best match for your home or business.

1. How to drain my hot water cylinder?

pull the inlet off and drain it into a bucket. even 20 year old water heaters have drain valves

2. What type of hot water cylinder is this?

You will need to remove the:"insulation" and show any additional piping., but my guess with the lid that appears not to be a closed system is also B

3. Having problem draining my mains pressure hot water cylinder?

It sounds like either somewhere in the system the hot and cold are cross leaking (such as in a shower mixer valve that automatically controls the max temperature of the shower) OR your supply valve or isolation valve may be not closing fully. Just yesterday I was messing with a hot water line and it would not stop running. I closed the inlet valve and drained off the pressure but did not drain any of the water lines. AND I do not have any shower mixer valves. Still, after 20 minutes of relieving the pressure there was still a slight flow. If the leak is causing - or running the risk of causing - damage to something then you should either shut the water off completely and only turn it on when you NEED the water, OR you can shut the hot water off, switch the water heater off and leave a hot water valve open somewhere to continuously deplete the water pressure that is causing the "tempering" valve to leak. Quick question for you: What do you mean "I have a leaking tempering valve"? Are you referring to the "Over-temp, Over-pressure safety valve"? If so, they are easy enough to change. Just write down whatever information you have on the current valve and go to the hardware store and buy a new one. If you do not have pipe wrenches, buy an 8" wrench, most common size for all sorts of plumbing problems around the house. It's a good investment. If there's a pipe coming down from the safety valve, remove that first. Then WITH THE MAIN WATER SHUT OFF AND PRESSURE RELIEVED remove the safety valve and install the new one. Be sure to use teflon tape. It's only a few bucks but will prevent any leaks from occurring at the threaded connections. Ask for some advice on how to use it from your local hardware store. It's definitely not rocket science, it's a job anyone can handle. Then restore the pressure and check for leaks. If it still leaks you may have to tighten it a little more. Always point the outlet down. Once you've got it to where it does not leak you can put the down pipe back on. BUT WHAT IF YOU'RE TALKING ABOUT A DIFFERENT SORT OF VALVE? Until I know exactly what you have it's hard to give you the correct advice. The best advice may be to just keep the water off until it can be fixed. If you can tolerate a slow drip you might just put a bucket there and keep an eye on it, draining the bucket when it gets half way full. Since at night you are not using water, shut it off for the night to eliminate the possibility of the bucket from overflowing. Hope this helps. 'av'a g would ay mate. '')

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Will Increasing the Temperature of My Hot Water Cylinder's Thermostat Make My Shower Water Supply La
You will have hotter water, which will last longer in the shower because you will be mixing it with more cold water to get the right temperature when you use it.The down-side is that:It will cost you more to run. Hotter water "leaks" more energy into the surrounding area. It's easier to get really serious burns.1. hot water cylinder fitted new pressure valve but still dripping out of overflow pipe?Commiserations old mate. Mine is doing the exact same thing. Guess what? The piping inside has split and we both need a new heater. Sorry for the bad news.2. Boiler Type Guide | Types of BoilerHere at Swale Heating we understand that selecting a new boiler can be a confusing and daunting task - for most people buying a new boiler is not an everyday occurence so the terminology can be a tad confusing! There are a few different types of boiler available and if you want a direct replacement then the type of boilers required will be specific to your property and the way the central heating system is setup. With our boiler type guide we hope to shed some light on the different types of boilers available and try to outline the main differences between each boiler type and suggests the core benefits for each system. A Combi boiler, full name Combination boiler, is the most popular choice of boiler across the nation. They are cost effective and energy efficient as water gets heated when it is needed and it does not require a separate hot water store. A combi boiler is a water heater and central heating boiler in one, which is an efficient choice for flats and small to medium size houses, where there is not high hot water demand i.e. multiple users at the same time. Combi boilers have a secondary heat exchanger, which heats the domestic hot water directly from the mains water supply on demand. It means that hot water is continuous and will not run out, furthermore, assuming the cold mains supply to the property is sufficient, it's possible to have a powerful shower without the need for a pump. You can fit a combi boiler in a smaller home as it can fit into tight spaces and does not require a feed and expansion tank, hot water cylinder or cold water storage tank; possibly freeing up loft space. Combi boilers rely on the mains water pressure to distribute domestic water around your home and so the hot water flow rate will reduce if multiple hot water outlets are utilised at the same time. As a result of the compact design, it's possible to free up space within a property if you install one as a replacement for a conventional/regular boiler setup. The image to the right hand side shows an example of a common combi boiler system set-up. Please be aware, combination boilers require a powerful mains flow rate to work effectively and this should be checked prior to installing one. A Regular boiler, also known as a conventional or heat only boiler, is used in a typical 'classic' heating system setup, where there is also a cold water storage tank (feeding the hot water cylinder), hot water cylinder and feed and expansion tank (which maintains the appropriate water level in the central heating system). By creating a hot water store, the system is able to deal with higher hot water demand and is often used in conjunction with a domestic hot and cold water pump, which rapidly distribute domestic water around the property. They are often designed to be able to cope with multiple hot water outlets being used at the same time. Conventional boilers are suited to homes with an older radiator system, which may not cope with the higher pressures, which combi and system boilers work at. They are a good option where water pressure is low, as other means can be utilised to increase the domestic water performance in the property e.g. a pump. They can also be used in conjunction with solar water heating panels. The image to the right hand side shows an example of a Regular boiler system set-up: A System boiler is very similar to a conventional boiler as they both require a hot water cylinder. However, a system boiler has all the major components for the heating system built in to it (an expansion vessel and a pump). This can make the installation easier and faster. If you use one with an unvented cylinder (details below), there is no need to have a cold water storage tank, which means space in lofts can be freed up to allow for a future conversion if required. They are ideal in homes with high hot water usage and the installation can be neater as a result of the boiler's inbuilt components. The above image on the left shows an example of a System boiler system set-up with an open-vented hot water cylinder, the image on the right shows an example of a System boiler system set-up with a pressurised unvented hot water cylinder. If you have any other questions or queries then feel free to give us a call and we will point you in the right direction.3. Replacing a thermal store - hot water cylinder?Just opening the taps will not drain the cistern, as the supply piping only runs through a heat exchanger inside the unit. Disconnect the power supply long enough ahead of time that the water cools down before attempting anything - per the manufacturer the water in the cistern will be around 55C, which is hot enough to cause scalding.With the exception of the cistern, disconnecting this will be similar to disconnecting a tankless hot water heater here in the States. Turn off the cold water supply first, then put something to catch water under the connection for the hot water outlet. If there's a cut-off on the hot water side, close it. If not, make sure all your taps are closed while you disconnect the hot water supply from the unit. This will be kind of like holding your thumb over the top of a straw - it keeps gravity and atmospheric pressure from draining all of the pipes in a torrent as soon as you disconnect it. After you have the pipe open, have someone go around and open taps one by one to allow the supply side to drain out while you catch the water.I can not tell from the documentation I could find if there's a drain for the cistern or not, but I would be surprised if there was not . Look for one at the bottom of the unit (you can see the drain on the bottom of the new model you linked to). If there is not one, you may have to resort to sucking the water out through the cistern fill port with a wet-dry vac
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